George Eliot Review Issue 29: 1998

Description

Issue 29 of the George Eliot Review
Contains:
Annual Report - 1997
My Own Dear Heart's Ease': George Eliot's Coventry Friend, Caroline (Cara) Bray
Review of The Ideology of Imagination: Subject and Society in the Discourse of Romanticism by Forest Pyle
George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 1997: "A Troubled Friendship"
Toast to the Immortal Memory of George Eliot, 1997
The Idea of an English Gentleman: Mr Knightley and Arthur Donnithorne
Review of Phantom Formations: Aesthetic Ideology and the Bildungsroman. By Marc Redfield
EMW: The Stereotyped Edition's Title Page Vignettes
Mathilde Blind
Review of The Quest for Anonymity: The Novels of George Eliot by Henry Alley
Address at the George Eliot Memorial Gardens Wreath Laying, 1997
Review of George Eliot by Josephine McDonagh
Review of A Monument to the Memory of George Eliot. Edith J. Simcox's Autobiography of a Shirtmaker edited by Constance M. Fulmer and Margaret E. Barfield
Review of Silas Marner, adapted and directed by Geoffrey Beevers, Orange Tree Theatre, 1998
American Branch Report 1997
Grand and Vague': Why is Daniel Deronda about the Jews? (Prize Winning Essay)
Address at the Westminster Abbey Wreath Laying, 1997
A Note on Daniel Deronda's Circumsision
Gwendolyn's Story from Daniel Deronda (Audio Casette), read by Gabriel Woolf and Rosaline Shanks
Hardy and Eliot': A Response
Review of The Power of Knowledge: George Eliot and Education by Linda K. Robertson
Front Matter 1998: 29

I'm sure you all know more about George Eliot than I do, so I thought I'd talk for a few min-utes about the difficulties and joys of adapting her work, and especially Adam Bede for the stage. I'd been asked to adapt Adam Bede for the Orange Tree…

My modest purpose in this essay is to develop the interesting suggestion of Ellen Moers in Literary Women that George Eliot's inspiration to write Adam Bede may well have lain in her attentive reading of Emma: that Adam Bede himself is the heroic and…

This book derives from half a lifetime's teaching and the author's obvious affinity for George Eliot. It is earnest, sometimes engaging, often off centre. It also exists in a kind of time-warp, somewhere in the 1960s in terms of tone and stance,…