Browse Documents (28 total)

  • Collection: George Eliot Review Issue 25: 1994

Women and Jews in Daniel Deronda

When Daniel Deronda was first published in 1876 George Eliot was disappointed that readers tended to 'cut the book into scraps and talk of nothing in it but Gwendolen. I meant everything in the book to be related to everything else there'. Her…

Tito, Dionysus and Apollo: an Examination of Tito Melema in Romola

Greek myth is significant throughout George Eliot’s work, and is especially important in the characterization of Tito Melema. A particular identification with Dionysus or Baccus begins early in the novel when Nello, after remarking that the…

Some Notes on George Eliot and Greek Myth

These notes comment first of all upon some points in Joseph Wiesenfarth's article 'Mythic perspectives in George Eliot's Fiction' in The George.Eliot Review, 24, 1993. One of his interpretations of an allusion to Greek myth relates to Farebrother's…

Review of The Gladness of the World: A Celebration of George Eliot in Words and Music

The Gladness of the World (the title is a quotation of the concluding words of George Eliot's religiously humanistic poem, '0 May I Join the Choir Invisible') was a'wide-rang-ing, often moving, programme of readings of passages from George Eliot, and…

Review of The BBC's Middlemarch

From 12th January to 16th February 1994 the BBC screened its six-part Middlemarch, produced by Louis Marks, scripted by Andrew Davies and directed by Anthony Page, six safe hands (too safe?). It has been issued as a two-cassette videogram (BBCV 5253,…

Review of Romola (The Clarendon Edition) Edited by Andrew Brown

George Eliot wrote of Romola in 1877 that she 'could swear by every sentence as having been written with my best blood.' Romola was the only historical novel she ever wrote, and the editor of the Clarendon edition, Andrew Brown, describes it as 'the…

Review of Realist Fiction and the Strolling Spectator by John Rignall

The problem of vision, of what the artist or writer sees, is among the most fascinating of the links between literature and painting, which separates them both from music. Vision itself implies something seen which cannot be separated from an inner…

Review of Outside the Pale: Cultural Exclusion, Gender Difference and the Victorian Woman Writer by Elsie B. Michie

Why does Dorothea fall apart at the sight of Rome? Elsie B. Michie's answer to this ques-tion is that the Rome scenes in Middlemarch stage a drama of female cultural exclusion. Dorothea's distressed response to the ruined 'city of visible history'…

Review of George Eliot: Ihr Leben by Elsemarie Maletzke

In the epilogue to her life of George Eliot Elsemarie Maletzke pays tribute to the work of Gordon S. Haight and states that biographers who have come after him have found noth-ing really new to add beyond a more critical assessment of Eliot's person.…

Review of George Eliot and the Conventions of Popular Women's Fiction: A Serious Literary Response to the 'Silly Novels by Lady Novelists' by Susan Rowland Tush

As Susan Rowland Tush notes, recent critics have given considerable attention (often rather harshly) to George Eliot's essay 'Silly Novels by Lady Novelists', which was pub-lished in the Westminster Review in October 1856. Among these critics are…

Review of Fallen Women in the Nineteenth-Century Novel by Tom Winnifrith

Focusing on the figure of the 'fallen woman' in nineteenth-century fiction, Tom Winnifrith's Fallen Women in the Nineteenth-Century Novel examines the sexual mores of fictional characters in the context of nineteenth-century sexual values generally,…

Notes on Contributors 1994

Jonathan Ouvry is the great-great grandson of George Henry Lewes, and has been President of the Fellowship since 1984. Kathleen Adams has been Secretary of the Fellowship since 1968. She initiated the Review in 1970, was editor until 1981 and…

Metafiction and Metaphor: Daniel Deronda as Golem

A criticism of George Eliot's Daniel Deronda, from Henry James onwards, is that it is a novel of two halves: the realist Gwendolen half, and the visionary Mordecai half. These two are regarded as unable to mesh, and thus weaken the novel in structure…

Message from the President, Jonathan Ouvry, 1994

If every dog has its day, perhaps every novel has its year and if so this is the year of Middlemarch. I looked forward to the television production with some misgivings, feeling that it would be impossible for the immense depth and scope of the novel…

London Branch Report 1993

This is our farewell note as officers of the London Branch. We resigned in April, Michael Forrest our Secretary in March. We understand that the Fellowship Council has approved Elizabeth Gundrey's ideas for a number of events to be held in the future…

George Eliot's Weimar

When George Eliot and G. H. Lewes arrived in Weimar on 2 August 1854, their expecta-tion were high. They had come to Germany primarily to collect material for Lewes's biog-raphy of Goethe on which he had been working for some time, but the journey…

George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 1993: "George Eliot in the Letters of George Henry Lewes"

I am preparing an edition of the letters of G. H. Lewes. The edition is selective. It does not include those 722 G. H. Lewes items (letters, extracts from his journals and diaries) included in Gordon S. Haight's monumental The George Eliot Letters…

George Eliot in South Africa

In 1992 I made my first visit to South Africa. I had always wanted to see for myself what life was like there and come to my own conclusions. It was an extraordinary time to visit. Mandela had been released from gaol and a referendum of the whites…

George Eliot and the British Museum Reading Room

I have recently undertaken a search of the Central Archives of the British Museum in an attempt to ascertain the date that George Eliot first used the facilities of the Reading Room of, what was then, the British Museum Library. It occurred to me…

George Eliot and Greek Tragedy

A quotation from Romola in S. H. Butcher's essay on Sophocles (1891) first led me to George Eliot as a reader of Greek tragedy: Our deeds are like children that are born to us; they live and act apart from our will: nay, children may be strangled,…

Editor's Note

After twelve years as its co-editor, Dr Graham Handley has decided to resign from the Review. He has many exciting literary projects - George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, Anthony Trollope - which are going to occupy him full time, though I know that his…

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Day School on the Novels of George Eliot at Birkbeck College

A seminar on George Eliot's novels was held at Birkbeck College, London, on Saturday, November 13th, 1993. It was chaired by Laurel Brake, of the Extra-Mural Department of London University, and the speakers were Rosemary Ashton, Professor of English…

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BBC 2 Night School: George Eliot

It is said that Napoleon interviewed his prisoners at three o'clock in the morning when their powers of resistance were at their lowest ebb. My video recorder saved me from test-ing his theory between the unearthly hours of 2.00 and 4.00 a.m. on…

Annual Report - 1993

The year's events began in a quite festive manner. Although the Annual General Meeting in March produced no special surprises, it was the 25th anniversary of my election as Fellowship Secretary so 1 provided cakes instead of the usual mundane…

American Branch Report 1993

Linda Robertson has worked hard at getting a George Eliot session at the annual MLA Convention, so far without success. But she sends her usual report of a friendly gathering during the Conference which brings together members in the USA. On December…