Browse Documents (18 total)

  • Collection: George Eliot Review Issue 28: 1997

A Forgotten Critic: Abba Goold Woolson's George Eliot and her Heroines: A Study

I feel that one should draw attention to the fact that in 1886 an American woman established certain emphases which succeeding critics followed, developed and extended in the twentieth century. This small book (published by Harper Brothers, New York)…

Address at the George Eliot Memorial Gardens Wreath Laying, 1996

Yesterday evening Pat Williams and I much enjoyed performing our recital based on George Eliot's words and on her concert-going and home musical entertainment experiences. Usually a recital programme of this kind is given once and never heard again…

Address at the Unveiling of John Lett's Statue of George Eliot at the George Eliot Hospital Nuneaton, 29 August 1996

This is, of course, the second time many of us have attended the unveiling of a statue of George Eliot. The last time was in 1986 and John, I know, will remember what an exciting time that was. Even before the unveiling we had met in Newdegate Square…

Address at the Westminster Abbey Wreath Laying, 1996

It has always seemed to me, and doubtless to many others, that some of the most moving and evocative words ever written by George Eliot occur near the beginning of the third chapter of her last novel, Daniel Deronda: A human life, I think, should be…

American Branch Report 1996

The seventh annual dinner of the American branch was held at the I Matti restaurant in Washington, D.C. on 29 December 1996. There was no formal programme, but the tradition-al toast was offered and greetings were delivered from members who could not…

Annual Report - 1996

When our year began with the Annual General Meeting we had the opportunity to accept our new Constitution. This enabled us to apply for and receive Charitable Status which we hope will be a useful situation for us in the future. At the meeting we…

George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 1996: "The Larger Meaning of Your Voice: Varieties of Speech in George Eliot"

When Ladislaw has watched and listened to Dorothea in the Vatican Museum, he says to the painter Naumann that language is superior to painting and 'gives a fuller image, which is all the better for being vague.[ ... ] This woman whom you have just…

Having the Whip-hand in Middlemarch

In one of the first reviews of Proust's Du côté de chez Swann, appropriately published in the journal Le Temps, in 1913, the critic Paul Souday takes Proust to task for writing too much like an Englishman. 'His copious narratives have something of…

'Heard but Not Seen': An Anthology of Victorian Childhood devised and presented by Gabriel Woolf and Rosalind Shanks, Nuneaton Town Hall and Warwick Arts Centre, 17 and 18 April 1997

This year's performance of readings was subtitled A Victorian Edition of Children's Hour, and was intended for adults. The programme was constructed round the framework of the child-hood of Tom and Maggie from The Mill on the Floss and included…

Review of Felix Holt, the Radical. Two new editions, Ed. A.G. can den Broek and Lynda Mugglestone

With Romola, Felix Holt, the Radical has generally proved to be George Eliot's least appreci-ated novel. Romola used to be safely categorized as 'smelling of the lamp', while Felix Holt was awkwardly 'political'. Despite a continuing critical unease…

Review of George Eliot and Europe edited by John Rignall

George Eliot and Europe arrives at a timely moment, when the nature of the relationship between Britain and the Continent is at best ambiguous, and when the parameters of 'Europe' are anxiously contested. In some ways, things have not altered much…

Review of George Eliot: A Life by Rosemary Ashton

Fifty years after John Cross's hagiographic George Eliot's Life as Related in her Letters and Journals (1885), Gordon Haight planned a more forthright biography but first found that it would be necessary to re-edit those letters and journals…

Review of Imperialism at Home: Race and Victorian Women's Fiction by Susan Meyer

My favourite exam 'howler' came from a first year student who wrote lyrically of the episode in Wuthering Heights in which Cathy opened the window, 'and the Moors came pounding in' - as though a hundred dark-skinned men on horse back came trampling…

Review of Middlemarch's Three New Editions, ed. Rosemary Ashton; by David Caroll with a new introduction by Felicia Bonaparte; and by Margaret Harris and Judith Johnson

Readers of Middlemarch, it is a pleasure to report, are now spoilt for choice. Joining an already saturated market are three new paperback editions, attractively produced at a very reasonable price with full critical apparatus, including textual…

Review of Sex Scandal, the Private Parts of Victorian Fiction by William A. Cohen

I feel I should begin with a warning: 'this review contains material which some readers may find offensive'. I apologize, but it is not my fault. The book centres on the relation between sex scandals and literature. Cohen believes that Victorian…

Review of The Mill and the Floss: A New Edition ed. Beryl Gray

Where texts are concerned the modem student of Victorian Fiction has an Aladdin's Cave to choose from. The title under review is The Mill on the Floss. High-street bookshops will have on display in their 'classics' section up to seven competing…

Review of The Mill on the Floss BBC 1, 1 January 1997

In this lamentably impoverished adaptation by Hugh Stoddart (directed by Graham Theakston), a character identified as Sophy Deane (played by Joanna David) masqueraded as one of three Dodson sisters. That George Eliot created a unit of four sisters is…

'Tied to my heart by a cord which can never be broken': George Eliot and her Sister Chrissey

Christiana Evans, always known as Chrissey, was the first child of Robert Evans's marriage to Christiana Pearson of Astley, near Nuneaton, and she was born, as were Isaac and Mary Ann, at Arbury (now South) Farm on the Arbury estate in 1814. When the…