Browse Documents (22 total)

  • Collection: George Eliot Review Issue 29: 1998

A Note on Daniel Deronda's Circumcision

For the last twenty years or so critics have wondered if Daniel Deronda, the eponymous hero of George Eliot's last novel, was circumcised or not. If he was, he would scarcely have to wait for his mother's revelations to know he was a Jew. Some…

Address at the George Eliot Memorial Gardens Wreath Laying, 1997

I am deeply grateful for the honour of being invited to lay a wreath in memory of George Eliot, and to lay it in a place that meant so much to her... Nuneaton. Before the heavens opened, I pictured us all gathered outside surrounded by green grass,…

Address at the Westminster Abbey Wreath Laying, 1997

The nineteenth century was an age of travellers, including many famous British women trav-ellers. Lady Hester Stanhope lived for years in the Middle East, Mary Kingsley explored the jungles of Gabon and died while performing medical work in South…

American Branch Report 1997

The eighth annual MLA dinner, a typically informal and festive occasion, was held at the Ristorante Amalfi in Toronto on Sunday, 28 December 1997. Present were Michael Ballin, Margaret Barfield, Nancy Cervetti, Connie Fulmer, Bonnie Gerard, Gabe…

Annual Report - 1997

1997 was, as always, a busy year for the Fellowship, beginning with the Annual General Meeting on 14 March. Mrs Kathleen Porter retired from the Fellowship Council and was thanked for many supportive years. The Chairman had just completed twenty-five…

EMW: The Stereotyped Edition's Title Page Vignettes

On 2 November 1866, George Eliot wrote to John Blackwood approving of his proposal to publish an illustrated edition of her books. The project, she saw, was a wise one, as likely to assist in [the books'] circulation. In the abstract I object to…

Tags:

George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 1997: "A Troubled Friendship"

Edith Simcox is now usually remembered, if at all, as the woman who recorded in a secret journal ('Autobiography of a Shirt Maker') her passionate and physically unrequited love for George Eliot. Yet to her contemporaries Simcox was well known as a…

'Grand and Vague': Why is Daniel Deronda about the Jews? (Prize Winning Essay)

'I am sure you are right to leave everything grand and vague', George Eliot's publisher wrote bemusedly to her about Daniel Deronda's Zionism (Letters VI: 272). In his 'Conversation' on Daniel Deronda, Henry James too, like many contemporary and…

Gwendolyn's Story from Daniel Deronda (Audio Casette), read by Gabriel Woolf and Rosalind Shanks

In 1902, the essayist, Leslie Stephen, wrote that Daniel Deronda was 'two stories put side by side' and the 'Gwendolen Story' taken by itself was a 'masterly piece of social satire'. In his biography of George Eliot, Gordon Haight makes a general…

'Hardy and Eliot': A Response

In the last issue of the Review, Nicola Harris, in her Fellowship Prize Essay, discussed the dif-ferent attitudes of Hardy and George Eliot to 'moral perception'.' In the course of her argu-ment she refers to an article of mine, published several…

Mathilde Blind

The first titles in the Eminent Women Series published in 1883 by W. H. AlIen included stud-ies of Emily Bronte and George Sand (Margaret Fuller, Maria Edgeworth, Elizabeth Fry, and Harriet Martineau would be in the next wave) as well as Mathilde…

'My Own Dear Heart's Ease': George Eliot's Coventry Friend, Caroline (Cara) Bray

In September 1842 Mary Ann Evans wrote a short but illuminating letter to her Coventry friend Cara Bray: My own dear Heart's Ease [it was not unusual for her to give her closest friends the name of a flower as she had done this on several occasions…

Review of A Monument to the Memory of George Eliot. Edith J. Simcox's Autobiography of a Shirtmaker edited by Constance M. Fulmer and Margaret E. Barfield

The intensity of Edith Jemima Simcox's passion for George Eliot has been known to a twen-tieth-century reading public since the publication of K. A. McKenzie's Edith Simcox and George Eliot in 1961. McKenzie's book is a combination of summary and…

Review of George Eliot by Josephine McDonagh

While the old 'Writers and their Work' pamphlets were very useful in their staid, often belles-lettristic, way, since the series was relaunched in 1994 under the General Editorship of Isobel Armstrong it has made its mark in a more forthright and…

Review of Phantom Formations: Aesthetic Ideology and the Bildungsroman by Marc Redfield

Marc Redfield has written an ambitious, challenging and closely argued book with a scope extending even beyond what its title may suggest. While focusing in the German tradition of the Bildungsroman, or novel of education, it engages the whole…

Review of Silas Marner, adapted and directed by Geoffrey Beevers, Orange Tree Theatre, 1998

Following on from his extremely successful stage adaptation of Adam Bede, which won a Time Out award in 1991, Geoffrey Beevers chose to bring another George Eliot masterpiece, Silas Marner, to the stage at the Orange Tree theatre. With four stage…

Review of The Ideology of Imagination: Subject and Society in the Discourse of Romanticism by Forest Pyle

A first reaction to the title of this book might be to wonder that it has apparently not been used before: ideology, imagination, subject, society, discourse, Romanticism - a compendium of weighty terms elegantly linked. Another might be to sigh at…

Review of The Power of Knowledge: George Eliot and Education by Linda K. Robertson

This book, volume 61 of the University of Kansas Humanistic Studies series, purports to do one thing but delivers another. According to the blurb on the back cover, Robertson demon-strates that George Eliot had much to say on a number of educational…

Review of The Quest for Anonymity: The Novels of George Eliot by Henry Alley

This book derives from half a lifetime's teaching and the author's obvious affinity for George Eliot. It is earnest, sometimes engaging, often off centre. It also exists in a kind of time-warp, somewhere in the 1960s in terms of tone and stance,…

The Idea of an English Gentleman: Mr Knightley and Arthur Donnithorne

My modest purpose in this essay is to develop the interesting suggestion of Ellen Moers in Literary Women that George Eliot's inspiration to write Adam Bede may well have lain in her attentive reading of Emma: that Adam Bede himself is the heroic and…

Toast to the Immortal Memory of George Eliot, 1997

I'm sure you all know more about George Eliot than I do, so I thought I'd talk for a few min-utes about the difficulties and joys of adapting her work, and especially Adam Bede for the stage. I'd been asked to adapt Adam Bede for the Orange Tree…