Browse Documents (22 total)

  • Collection: George Eliot Review Issue 31: 2000

A Family's Eye View of George Eliot

There have been very many views expressed over the years about George Eliot - her genius, her behaviour and, inevitably, her looks. But what were the views of her family back in Nuneaton? It is well known that her brother Isaac, then very much the…

Address at the George Eliot Memorial Gardens Wreath Laying, 1999

We are here today to celebrate the life and works of George Eliot. 'I have heard of him, of course, but I have never read any of his books' - that is the expression that I, and many of the guides at Arbury hear when we mention the connection that…

Address at the Westminster Abbey Wreath Laying, 1999

The Guest of Honour was The Rt Hon. Chris Smith, MP, Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport. The Address he gave is summarized below: Mr Smith is a great admirer of George Eliot and it is said that he takes with him on holiday each year one…

Annual Report - 1999

During 1999 we were unusually busy in planning the extra events to take place in 2000. Before I began this report I had spent a few weeks updating the Story of the George Eliot Fellowship which had been published for our fiftieth anniversary in 1980…

Conference Report, Annual George Eliot Conference, Andara, Turkey, 1999: "George Eliot and Her Work"

George Eliot's works are not well-known in Turkey, except for The Mill on the Floss, which is regularly studied in university departments of English Literature as part of an introductory course to the English novel, and Silas Marner, which is…

George Eliot and Archery

As a practising archer with a keen interest in the history of the sport it has struck me that the importance of archery to the development of Eliot's final novel Daniel Deronda (1876) has not been properly appreciated. It provides the context for…

George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 1999: "'What Can I Do?' George Eliot, Her Reader and the Task of the Narrator in Middlemarch"

Middlemarch is widely recognized as being one of the most strenuously narrated novels in English literature. Many of the most moving, and most quoted, lines of the novel are the prod-uct of direct narrational intervention and the reader is aware of…

George Eliot's English Travels: "Widely Sundered Elements"

Although the Midlands people, places, and stories that turn up in Scenes of Clerical Life pro-vide the first and most easily recognized Warwickshire models in George Eliot's fiction, she also drew creatively on models she found during the many…

Japanese Branch Report 1999

The third annual convention of the George Eliot Fellowship of Japan was held at the beautiful Bunka Women's University in Musashino, Tokyo, on Saturday, 27 November 1999. On the rather cold day with eighty-seven active participants, the morning…

Obituary: Jerome Beaty (1924-2000)

Jerome Beaty died on 30 January 2000, at the age of 75, after a year of illness during which he was working actively on Dickens and George Eliot. He was a fine Victorian scholar and critic, an editor, and a pioneer in the field of George Eliot…

Obituary: Viscount Daventry (1921-2000)

Francis Humphrey Maurice FitzRoy Newdegate, 3rd Viscount Daventry, died at his home, Temple House at Arbury, on 15 February. He had been ill for some time. The Arbury Estate spans 4000 acres between Nuneaton and Bedworth and it was in one of the…

Review of George Eliot and Intoxication: Dangerous Drugs for the Condition of England by Kathleen McCormack

Famously insisting to her friend Barbara Bodichon that our 'highest calling' is 'to do without opium', George Eliot is not a writer whom one immediately associates with intoxication, although one of her earliest stories, 'Janet's Repentance' in…

Review of George Eliot's Middlemarch: A Guide for Students and Readers of the Novel

Among certain readers of this review, those already equipped with personal computers capa-ble of launching Cruise missiles at the twitch of a mouse, my opening paragraph will, if any-thing, pucker lips. But among the uninitiated it will probably…

Review of The Folio Society Edition of George Eliot's Fiction

The Millennium has provided a number of reasons for celebration, but for members of the Fellowship and admirers of George Eliot generally the year 2000 will see two signal recogni-tions of her status. Before it is out, the Oxford Reader’s Companion…

Review of The Journals of George Eliot ed. Margaret Harris and Judith Johnston and George Eliot: The Last Victorian by Kathryn Hughes

Kathryn Hughes has written a most readable biography, breezy, relaxed, clear narrative, just right for the reader of literary biography who isn't deeply interested in literature. The story of Mary Ann and Marian Evans, Marian Evans Lewes, George…

Review of The Letters of George Henry Lewes, Vol. 3 ed. William Baker

This helpful, clearly edited supplement to the original two-volume Letters of George Henry Lewes, which appeared in 1995, actually contains more letters by George Eliot than from Lewes: 79 by her and 54 by him, of which 92 (47 by him and 45 by her)…

Silas Marner and Felix Holt: Affinities and Antitheses

At first sight there seems little to link Silas Marner with Felix Holt. There are certainly con-trasts, but it is harder to find similarities between a short pastoral idyll and a complex politi-cal work that looks forward to Middlemarch rather than…

The Margins of George Eliot: Editing the Journals

Margins are back in fashion : it's no longer marginal to be marginal. Postcolonial theory has had the effect of demonstrating the relation between the imperial centre and the periphery of empire to be one of interaction and mutual reaction, not of…

'The Woman at the Window'

Dear Editors May I write a postscript to Terence R. Wright's review of Perspectives on Self and Community in George Eliot: Dorothea's Window in your last number? He says I 'come down strongly on lesser critics who make the mistake of locating…

Towards a Critical Reputation: Henry James on Felix Holt, the Radical

A productive starting point for a critical evaluation of Henry James's criticism of George Eliot's fiction is his unsigned review of Felix Holt, the Radical, which, as his first piece of criticism on her, is perhaps itself most usefully read against…

Women and Fiction in George Eliot's 'Brother Jacob'

'Brother Jacob' raises issues of perennial concern to George Eliot as an author who was also a woman. In particular, this fabular tale about a hapless confectioner and his imbecilic broth-er exposes the pitfalls in women's relationship(s) to cultural…