Browse Documents (19 total)

  • Collection: George Eliot Review Issue 36: 2005

Adam Bede, adapted and directed by Geoffrey Beevers, Orange Tree Theatre, Richmond

Adam Bede is not easily adaptable to the stage. Its structure is essentially narrative rather than dramatic, and much of its interest consists in the probing of moral issues and analysis of motive. A straightforward retelling of the plot without any…

Address at the George Eliot Memorial Gardens Wreath Laying, 2004

I am honoured and delighted to be here today to pay tribute to my great-great-grandfather, George Henry Lewes, and to George Eliot in the year that marks the 150th anniversary of the beginning of their life together. From an early age they have been…

Address at the Westminster Abbey Wreath Laying, 2004

150 years ago, in 1854, George Eliot, still Marian Evans at that point, and George Henry Lewes made the momentous decision to live together. They did so for 24 years until Lewes died and, in the first five years together, made literary history. We…

Aspects of 'Indefiniteness' in Middlemarch

In this article I will be teasing out the significance of the various uses and senses of 'indefiniteness' in Middlemarch. Whether it is in relationships between other characters, or between Dorothea and other characters, or between Dorothea and…

George Eliot and the Victorian Art World

Reading the letters and diaries of Victorian practitioners of the different arts reminds us that their social world differed markedly from that of artists today. In nineteenth-century London the number of people involved was sufficiently small for…

George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 2004: "'School-Time': George Eliot and Education"

In George Eliot's first piece of published fiction, the hero - if that's the right word for the hapless Reverend Amos Barton - is no advertisement for the conventional schooling of a middle-class Englishman. Though he has managed to struggle through…

Japanese Branch Report 2004

On Saturday, 27 November 2004, the eighth annual convention of the George Eliot Fellowship of Japan was held at Literature Hall in Kobe College (Kobe Jogakuin). The morning session began with an opening address by Kazuo Fujikawa (Okayama University),…

Legitimate Plots, Private Lots in Felix Holt and Daniel Deronda

A preoccupation with the idea of home was central to George Eliot's fiction from its beginnings until its end. In Felix Holt and Daniel Deronda, however, this theme is developed in terms that involve legal complexities that have embroiled her…

Moving Beyond Signs: The Crisis of Language in Daniel Deronda

It is no critical initiative to point out that George Eliot's Daniel Deronda (1876) plays with the premises of realist narrative art.! Previous readings have, however, tended to engage only tangentially with the way in which the novel scrutinises the…

Review of George Eliot by Tim Dolin and Middlemarch edited by Gregory Maertz

Both books under review appear in series that aim to give new currency to texts and authors by the provision of critical and cultural context. The implied audience is not simply the old 'sixth form and junior undergraduate' cohorts: there is a…

Review of George Eliot's Dialogue with John Milton by Anna K. Nardo

This, despite some blemishes and limitations indicated in passing below, is an examination of selected writings by Milton, the stories about him, and the engagement with his life and works which is reflected in the life and works of George Eliot.…

Review of Monomania: The Flight From Everyday Life in Literature and Art by Marina van Zylen

The obvious monomaniac in Middlemarch is Casaubon, determined and devoted to writing his 'Key to All Mythologies'. This, his idée fixe, orders his world and certainly his relationship with his wife Dorothea, who seems an unwitting victim of his…

Review of Our Daughters Must be Wives: Marriageable Young Women in the Novels of Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy by Britta Zangen

Adopting the' 1st Gent's' maxim from the epigraph to chapter ten of Eliot's Daniel Deronda: Our daughters must be wives,/ And to be wives must be what men will choose:/ Men's taste is women's test [. . .]', Britta Zangen sets out to test the accuracy…

Review of The Effective Protagonist in the Nineteenth-Century British Novel by Terence Dawson

Let me declare my critical prejudices from the outset. Terence Dawson's study is a work of psychological criticism, of post-Jungian criticism to be exact, and I am frequently left unconvinced by such critical inquiry. As Dawson admits, 'it is often…

Romantic Love as Spiritual Companionship? A Buddhist Re-reading of George Eliot

Like most of George Eliot's fiction, Daniel Deronda can be read as a story about the possibility of redemption. Gwendolen Harleth's vanity and ambition make her vulnerable to Grandcourt's desire for dominance, and their marriage is a disaster.…

The Widening Vision and Undying Hope in The Spanish Gypsy

On 20 May 1839, young Mary Ann Evans wrote to her close friend, Maria Lewis, about her 'oscillating judgment' on a religious matter: 'On no subject do I veer to all points of the compass more frequently than on the nature of the visible church. I am…

Toast to the Immortal Memory of George Eliot, 2005

Ladies and gentlemen, this is a special year because it is 150 years since George Eliot and G. H. Lewes began to live together openly. 22 November 1854 was her thirty-fifth birthday. Where were she and Lewes? What were they doing? They were in…

Annual Report - 2004

Our year never gets off to an exciting start because the first event is the Annual General Meeting but the 2004 one was rather different. The business meeting was completed swiftly as there was no change to the Council or to the officers. There was…