Browse Documents (19 total)

  • Collection: George Eliot Review Issue 37: 2006

Address at the Westminster Abbey Wreath Laying, 2005

Not all great writers are great readers, but George Eliot certainly was. A voracious reader of other writers - Dante, Goethe, Shakespeare, Milton, Wordsworth, Scott - she was also very fond of reading aloud. Her husband, John WaIter Cross, praised…

Aesop's Fables and George Eliot's Brother and Sister Sonnets

It is always exciting to discover something new and to come upon it unexpectedly. That was my happy experience a few years ago. I had decided to try my hand at devising a biographical programme on George Eliot and to attempt to portray her at the end…

Costanza, Constance, Custance, and Emaré: Romola's Medieval Ancestry (Prize Essay)

Arguably the most problematic episode of Romola for the novel's reviewers and critics is Romola's imitation of Boccaccio's heroine Costanza (or Gostanza) in the two chapters 'Drifting Away' and 'Romola's Waking'; even Romola's most favourable early…

George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 2005: "George Eliot and Weimar: 'an affinity for what the world calls "dull places'"

One hundred and fifty years ago this year, in June and July 1855, the future George Eliot published two articles in Fraser 's Magazine about her experiences in Weimar with G. H. Lewes between August and November 1854: 'Three Months in Weimar' and…

Imagination, Morality, and the Spectre of Sade in Romola and Daniel Deronda

In her final book, Impressions of Theophrastus Such, George Eliot vocalizes her contempt for writers who dismiss morality 'as a sort of twaddle for bibs and tuckers, a doctrine of dulness, a mere incident in human stupidity' (Impressions 134). It is…

Japanese Branch Report 2005

On Saturday 26 November 2005, the ninth Annual Convention of the George Eliot Fellowship of Japan was held at Tokyo Kasei University. The morning session began with an opening remark by Kazuo Fujikawa (Okayama University), followed by a welcome…

Laughing with George Eliot

The tradition of admiring George Eliot for her genius is as old as the author herself. Alexander Main, one of her more sycophantic devotees, laid the foundations of this tradition during her lifetime with the publication of Wise, Witty, and Tender…

Notes on Contributors 2006

Bill Adams has been Chairman of the Fellowship from 1971 until his retirement this year. Kathleen Adams has been Secretary of the Fellowship since 1968. She initiated the Review in 1970, was editor until 1981 and co-editor 1982-91. She published…

Review of Broadview Edition of Adam Bede, edited by Mary Waldron

This Broadview edition of Adam Bede has a biographical and critical introduction, appropriately integrating G. H. Lewes into its discourse, and useful essays on some of the themes of the novel, - Religion, Love, Rank and Status. There are short…

Review of George Eliot and Victoran Attitudes to Racial Diversity, Colonialism, Darwinism, Class, Gender, and Jewish Culture and Prophecy by Brenda McKay

Brenda McKay's volume, George Eliot and Victorian Attitudes to Racial Diversity, Colonialism, Darwinism, Class, Gender, and Jewish Culture and Prophecy will most likely appear on most of our students' and colleagues' bibliographies for some time to…

Review of George Eliot's English Travels by Kathleen McCormack

When we think of George Eliot, the word 'travels' is likely to suggest journeys to far-flung places in foreign lands, but considered in an English setting, she seems to be locked in either Warwickshire or London. Kathleen McCormack, however, shows…

Review of Literature and Medicine in Nineteenth-Century Britain by Janis McLarren Caldwell

The title of this study somewhat belies its range and ambition. Caldwell offers a compelling account of the connections between medicine, hermeneutics and theology in the early and mid-century, and uses these related disciplines as the bases of…

Review of Realist Vision by Peter Brooks

In 1884, Émile Zola wrote the preface to the catalogue for a retrospective exhibition of Édouard Manet's paintings. 'Forget ideas of perfection and of the absolute', the author implored: 'don't believe that something is beautiful because it is…

Review of The Complete Shorter Poetry of George Eliot ed. A.G. van den Broek

This is the first fully edited and annotated edition of George Eliot's poems to appear in print. 'Shorter' means all the poems except The Spanish Gypsy, which is to appear in a companion volume by the same editors in 2008. Whatever arguments there…

Review of The Reenchantment of 19th-Century Fiction: Dickens, Thackeray, George Eliot and Serialization by David Payne

'To begin reading George Eliot,' David Payne suggests, 'is speedily to encounter the conviction that modernity is best approached from an oblique angle.' Unlike, say, her contemporary, Charles Dickens, George Eliot's fictions 'return us to the…

Toast to the Immortal Memory of George Eliot, 2005

I always used to be an admirer of Charles Lamb until I read recently his view of bluestockings or intellectual women writers: 'If she belonged to me I would lock her up and feed her on bread and water, till she left off writing poetry. A female poet,…

A Most Remarkable Cat

Because George Eliot is buried in London's Highgate Cemetery the Fellowship is a member of the Friends of Highgate Cemetery who care for this vast burial area. We receive a regular newsletter from the Friends which recently reported that Domino, the…

Annual Report - 2005

Our year began uneventfully with the AGM held for the first time at the Heritage Centre with the added advantage of easy and free parking and the opportunity to provide refreshments. There were no changes to the Fellowship Council or to the officers.…

Annual Report - 2006

My Address at the AGM is usually concerned with our plans and hopes for the future but perhaps on this rather special day I may be allowed a glance at the past. Last week I chaired a Council meeting for the last time; my first one was on 6 March…