Browse Documents (19 total)

  • Collection: George Eliot Review Issue 41: 2010

The Representation of Place in Middlemarch

Critics in the past have tended to refer to the rootedness of characters in George Eliot's novels. This is particularly true of Adam Bede, where the naturalistic roots of characters are often explicitly stated, such as when Dinah affirms 'I'm not…

Review of Daniel Deronda, adapted by John Cooper and performed by Traffic of the Stage

A dramatized version of Daniel Deronda scripted by John Cooper was produced by the Traffic of the Stage Company at the Upstairs at the Gatehouse Theatre in Highgate in May. Directed by Harry Meacher, it had a cast of seventeen actors who between them…

Review of Charles Dickens by Michael Slater

On the first page of this splendid new biography, Dickens is cited referring to his own earliest writings as 'certain tragedies achieved at the mature age of eight or ten and represented with great applause to overflowing nurseries'. The genially…

George Eliot as Historian: The Case of Mr. Crewe and Hugh Hughes

'My sketches [ ... ] of Churchmen [ ... ] are drawn from close observation of them in real life, and not at all from hearsay or the descriptions of novelists.' George Eliot 'Mr Tryan is not a portrait of any clergyman, living or dead'. George Eliot…

Japanese Branch Report 2009

Overlooking the meandering Edo River and the panoramic view of the Tokyo skyline, the thirteenth annual convention of the George Eliot Fellowship of Japan was held at the scenic campus of Wayo Women's University on Saturday, 28 November 2009. After…

Mrs. Meyrick's Cat

'''Great God!" the words escaped Deronda' as he watched the just-prevented-from-drowning Mirah. 'The old thought had come now with a new impetus of mingled feeling, and urged that exclamation in which both East and West have for ages concentrated…

Adam Bede and Emigration

Although emigration to settler colonies was a widespread phenomenon in mid nineteenth-century Britain, it is a theme to which George Eliot appears to give very little attention. Of all the works, Adam Bede is the novel which seems especially…

Expressive Things in Adam Bede

A drop of ink is the first thing in the first sentence of George Eliot's first novel: 'With a single drop of ink for a mirror, the Egyptian sorcerer undertakes to reveal to any chance corner far-reaching visions of the past.' Like many objects in…

Superior Domesticity: Two George Eliot Cats

The Persian cat, Hafiz, appears in two scenes in Daniel Deronda (1876). The first of these appearances occurs in chapter 18, which introduces the compact, creative little Meyrick women - mother and three daughters - just as they are about to become…

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Editor's Note

1. The articles in this issue by Dinah Birch, Rachel Bowlby, Barbara Hardy, and Josephine McDonagh were originally delivered as papers at the Adam Bede conference held at the Institute of English Studies, University of London, on 7 November 2009. 2.…

Toast to the Immortal Memory of George Eliot, 2009

2009 is the 150th anniversary of the publication of two works of fiction by George Eliot. As no one here could fail to know, throughout the year there have been all kinds of celebrations of her first - and wonderful- novel, Adam Bede (and the word…

George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 2009: "A Loss for Words"

A loss for words ... I am genuinely lost for words in my admiration of the novels but the title of today's talk is intended to dig a bit below the surface of simple enjoyment and highlight some of the differences - strengths and weaknesses - between…

Notes on Middlemarch and Romola

Rereading Middlemarch and Romola recently, I was struck by some unrecorded musical and literary parallels, none of them substantial enough (or indeed sufficiently interconnected) to be woven into an integrated article, but having, I hope, enough…

The Art of Conduct, the Conduct of Art and the Mixed Science of Eliot's Ethics: 'The Sympathetic Impulse' and 'The Scientific Point of View' in The Mill on the Floss

The Mill on the Floss is full of keys and clues. Most famously, Maggie Tolliver, following her father's bankruptcy, 'wanted some key that would enable her to understand and, in understanding, endure, the heavy weight that had fallen on her young…

Annual Report - 2009

I am pleased to report that last year was a successful one. There are things we might have done better, or differently, but I think we can say that 2009 was marked by events which provided huge pleasure and satisfaction for our members, and for a…

'Hetty had never read a novel': Adam Bede and Realism

It is not just the famous Chapter 17, 'In Which the Story Pauses a Little', which makes George Eliot's Adam Bede one of the first candidates for any discussion of the tenets and aims of nineteenth-century literary realism. The question is opened in…

Review of George Eliot's Intellectual Life by Avrom Fleishman

Avrom Fleishman's study of George Eliot as a Victorian intellectual comes late in a distinguished career of scholarly publication that stretches over more than forty years. The book primarily concerns itself with some large questions: What were…

'Good teaching': Adam Bede and Education

George Eliot's commitment to teaching motivates her writing from the first. Like many of those whose thinking was shaped by early nineteenth-century evangelicalism, she saw education as a vital responsibility. In 1847, when she was twenty-eight years…

Review of Women Reviewing Women in Nineteenth-Century Britain: The Critical Reception of Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte and George Eliot by Joanne Wilkes

The subtitle of Joanne Wilkes' elegant and meticulous monograph is somewhat misleading. Although Austen, Bronte and Eliot make regular appearances, as one would expect the three major female literary figures of the nineteenth century to do, the work…