Browse Documents (21 total)

  • Collection: George Eliot Review Issue 42: 2011

Review of The Cambridge Companion to English Literature, 1830--1914 edited by Joanne Shattock

This anthology, edited by Joanne Shattock, with an introduction and contribution by her, contains a rich variety of essays by scholars from British, American and Canadian universities. It begins its survey of Victorian culture in the seven years…

Review of Imagining Italy: Victorian Writer and Travellers edited by Catherine Waters, Micael Hollington and John Jordan

Two of the essays in this volume take George Eliot's Romola as their subject. Both reward attention, and they may be in danger of escaping deserved notice given the major concentration here on the life and writing of Dickens. This is the second of…

'Even our failures are a prophecy': The Mill on the Floss and the 1860s

My title comes from a poem, 'A Minor Prophet’, written by George Eliot in 1865, and I want to enlist its help in showing in this paper how the failures she experienced during the decade following the publication of The Mill on the Floss turned into…

Japanese Branch Report 2010

On Saturday 4 December 2010, the Fourteenth Annual Convention of the George Eliot Fellowship of Japan was held at Okayama University. The morning session began with an opening remark by Hiroshi Oshima (Hyogo University of Teacher Education), followed…

Narration in Middlemarch Revisited

In a previously published article entitled 'The Role of the Narrator in George Eliot's Novels', I attempted to defend her narrator (particularly in regard to Middlemarch) from a variety of critical attacks. The main points of my argument were: (I)…

'Pier-glass Imagery' in Middlemarch

In 'George Eliot's Middlemarch as a translation of Spinoza's Ethics' (GER 40), Miriam Henson refers to the author's use of 'pier glass' imagery to illustrate her theory of morality and to show how an individual looks at the world from his self as the…

Translating The Mill on the Floss into French

Before dealing with my personal experience of translating The Mill on the Floss into French, I shall start with a few remarks on George Eliot's literary status in France compared with that in English-speaking countries. In Britain, in the States and…

Address at the Westminster Abbey Wreath Laying, 2010

It seems extraordinary to think that 150 years ago Mary Ann Evans, a young woman with very few resources apart from a strong conscience and an enquiring mind, almost ruined her life by revealing to her father that she was no longer certain that the…

Enter the Aunts

My title is taken from Chapter 7 of 'Book First' of The Mill on the Floss which describes the moment we first meet Aunts Glegg, Pullet and Deane in all their bustling, sharp-tongued, comic glory. The full title of the chapter is 'Enter the Aunts and…

Review of Daniel Deronda, trans. Alain Jumeau

Alain Jumeau's new French translation of Daniel Deronda is the first since Ernest David's in 1881, 1882 and 1886, no longer easily accessible. Jumeau is an excellent George Eliot scholar as well as an experienced translator - his translations include…

Review of George Eliot's Grammar of Being by Melissa Anne Raines

Readers of The George Eliot Review will be familiar with the work of Melissa Anne Raines, which began with the publication of her prize-winning essay for the George Eliot Fellowship, and was followed by several articles, two in this journal, now part…

Between Deafness and Sound: Aurality and the Limits of Sympathy in The Mill on the Floss

In his review of The Mill on the Floss on 19 May 1860 for The Times, E. S. Dallas began by arguing that Eliot's first novel Adam Bede was successful because 'the temporary delight of listening to a pleasant tale' it gave its readers helped to achieve…

Annual Report - 2010

It is pleasing to report another successful year for the Fellowship, albeit with the occasional blip where we were perhaps over-ambitious in our plans: we had to cancel two of our George Eliot Country Tours. We lost a few members, either as a result…

Mr. and Mrs. Cross with the Artist John Wharlton Bunney in Venice, June 1880

The dramatic incident in Venice on the morning of 16 June 1880, when the newly married John Walter Cross jumped into the Grand Canal from his hotel room's balcony, has attracted much curiosity and speculation. Understandably Mrs Cross (George Eliot)…

Review of The Mill on the Floss on the BBC in 1978

The 2010 London conference on The Mill on the Floss was designedly conscious of its distance in time from its subject - this distance being measurable by a round number. It was as important to keep in mind, however, the distance between the novel's…

Conference Report, Annual George Eliot Conference, University of London, 2010: "The Mill on the Floss"

'The Mill on the Floss is everyone's favourite novel' was the provocative declaration that launched the conference, devoted to Eliot's second novel, held at the Institute of English Studies on 6 November 2010. Barbara Hardy's opening statement was…

George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 2010: "The Mill on the Floss and the Difficulties of Relationships"

By late 1859, when she had almost finished writing The Mill on the Floss, George Eliot was still unsure of its final title. The working title was 'Sister Maggie', which was particularly appropriate to the first two thirds of the novel, where interest…

Review of Imagining Minds: The Neuro-Aesthetics of Austen, Eliot and Hardy by Kay Young

Imagining Minds sets out to read nineteenth-century fiction in the context of modern theories of human cognition and of the mind/body relationship, making the central contention that 'the novel is an aesthetic map to and experience of the nature of…