Browse Documents (19 total)

  • Collection: George Eliot Review Issue 43: 2012

Models of Authorship: Margaret Oliphant and George Eliot

This article is about the profession of authorship in the nineteenth century. More specifically it is about the writing lives of two women novelists. Margaret Oliphant's (1828-1897) work is unfamiliar to most modem readers, apart from her…

Review of George Eliot: Interviews and Recollections edited by K. K. Collins

In his introduction to this fascinating collection of accounts and comments by those who met George Eliot, K. K. Collins points out that modem biographies draw on about forty recollections that have come to form a canon of reminiscence. To this canon…

Knowing Too Much: The Burden of Consciousness in "The Lifted Veil"

In the spring of 1859, not long after the success of her first novel, Adam Bede, George Eliot submitted a much shorter work to her publisher, John Blackwood, for his consideration. Blackwood's eventual letter in response to the piece arrived more…

Review of The Art of Comparison: How Novels and Critics Compare by Catherine Brown

This book is a defence of comparative literature in theory - if it has a theory - and in practice by concentrating on three novels - Daniel Deronda, Anna Karenina, Women in Love – which are structurally similar in various respects, most obviously…

Deronda and the Tigress: Buddhism, Compassion, and National Consciousness in Daniel Deronda (Prize Essay)

Many scholars have written about George Eliot's treatment of Judaism in Daniel Deronda (hereafter DD), but no one has yet explored why George Eliot includes Buddhism in the novel. Eliot engages with Buddhism most explicitly in chapter thirty-seven…

Review of Modernizing George Eliot: The Novelist as Artist, Intellectual, Proto-Modernist, Cultural Critic by K.M. Newton

This distinguished work by a major Eliot scholar is the product of decades of reading, writing and reflection on her fiction and thought. It brings together in revised, homogenized form a series of essays from 1972 to the present day, including new…

'The generations of ants and beavers': Classical Economics and Animals in The Mill on the Floss

Before any named characters find their way into The Mill on the Floss, the narrator introduces us to two sets of animals (aside from a human driver): white ducks dipping their heads into the stream and horses pulling a covered wagon. The ducks are…

Review of The Business of the Novel: Economics, Aesthetics and the Case of Middlemarch by Simon R. Frost

With excellent research available on the publication history of Middlemarch, including work by John Sutherland, N. N. Feltes, Carol Martin, David Finkelstein and others, it may seem surprising that an entire book has now been devoted to the topic.…

Review of Silas Marner on BBC Radio 4

Unheralded in the Radio Times and elsewhere, Silas Marner, dramatized by Richard Cameron, was broadcast as the Classic Serial on Radio 4 in two one-hour instalments on 16 and 23 October 2011. I was pleased that I spotted it. George Eliot has been…

Review of Landscape and Gender in the Novels of Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot and Thomas Hardy by Eithne Henson

At the heart of Eithne Henson's book is a comment made by George Eliot when she reviewed Ruskin's Lectures on Architecture and Painting in 1854: 'To a certain degree, all artistic interpretation of Nature is conventional' (p. 75). Henson's concern is…

Review of Women and Personal Property in the Victorian Novel by Deborah Wynne

Dorothea Brooke was reluctant to accept the bequest of her mother's jewellery, but was George Eliot equally resistant to the allure of pretty things? Deborah Wynne thinks not. Wynne cites a letter from Eliot to her friend Elma Stuart in which the…

Review of George Eliot, European Novelist by John Rignall

On the opening page of this series of connected essays, John Rignall points out that 'George Eliot's readers and reviewers took it for granted that her novels belonged to a European tradition of fiction'. When Leavis conscripted her into his new…

Review of Dorothea's Daughter and Other Nineteenth-Century Postscripts by Barbara Hardy

This book is the fruit of many years of thought about nine great novels. Barbara Hardy does not present us with a series of sequels, though we do learn of things that happened after the action of the novels ended. Rather, she offers a set of…

Annual Report - 2011

It was a good year for the Fellowship. Our membership numbers held their own, and although some older members have difficulty getting to events, we have attracted new members who have been enthusiastic in their support. The theme for the year was…

'There is no such thing as natural barrenness in natural women': Childless Marriages in Silas Marner and "The Lifted Veil"

'There is no such thing as natural barrenness in natural women' wrote the eminent French psychologist Eugene Becklard in the 1840s, and, in general, physicians agreed with him. Certainly in mid-nineteenth-century literature children were the sine qua…

From George Eliot to her 'Rabbi': An Epistolary Find

Dear Mr. Deutsch I cannot be easy without writing a word or two this morning for I am conscious that I made myself more disagreeable than nature obliges me to be by my hard quips to you. They were not warrantable by anything but a strong personal and…

Review of The Life of George Eliot: A Critical Biography by Nancy Henry

The literary biographer's most difficult task is to find plausible, sophisticated ways of connecting a human life with the art that emerges from it. In the case of a major imaginative artist like George Eliot, the accumulated weight of previous…

Japanese Branch Report 2011

On Saturday 3 December 2011, the Fifteenth Annual Convention of the George Eliot Fellowship of Japan was held at Ferris University. The morning session began with an opening address by Hidetada Mukai (Ferris University). Three papers were presented…