Browse Documents (19 total)

  • Collection: George Eliot Review Issue 45: 2014

Toast to the Immortal Memory of George Eliot, 2013

First of all may I say what an enormous honour it is to be asked to speak on this very special occasion. When John asked me in January what I was doing on 24 November, I was obviously not quick enough to think of a reason to duck out of…

Conference Report, Annual George Eliot Conference, 2014: "Romola and Felix Holt"

George Eliot's two Marmite novels - given their reputations, not everyone tries them, and when they do, they often leave them only partially digested - Romola (1862-3), the one she famously said aged her, and Felix Holt (1866), the one with that…

Japanese Branch Report 2013

On Saturday 7 December 2013, the Seventeenth Annual Convention of The George Eliot Fellowship of Japan was held at Keio University. The morning session started with an opening address by Maiko Otake (Obirin University). Three papers were presented in…

Obituary: Andrew Brown (1950-2014)

I first met Andrew Brown on the conference circuit in the early 1980s. As the recently appointed senior editor for literature at Cambridge University Press he was a regular presence at Victorian Studies conferences, wearing his Press hat, but unlike…

'In isolation human power is limited, in combination it is infinite': Tracing Ludwig Feuerbach's Essence of Christianity through Daniel Deronda

Written between January 1873 and June 1876, Daniel Deronda was George Eliot's final and most ambitious novel. The Jewish-born, later excommunicated Dutch philosopher Baruch Spinoza, whose Ethics Eliot translated in 1856, would perhaps seem the more…

Romola and Politics

It could properly be argued that Romola is George Eliot's most overtly political novel. Unlike Felix Holt or Middlemarch it doesn't directly refer to near contemporary political events, or to those of George Eliot's childhood and youth. Unlike Adam…

George Eliot and Psychosomatic Illness: A Footnote to the Biographies

A reader of George Eliot's novels, with their luminous intelligence and authoritative command of a fictional world, might be surprised to learn that this author was actually frequently tormented by crises of confidence, exhaustion and bodily pain.…

Review of After Darwin: Animals, Emotions, and the Mind edited by Angelique Richardson

This extremely interesting and well organized collection of 11 original essays and an 'Afterword' is not greatly concerned with George Eliot, although it would seem every major Victorian concern somehow ends by involving her. As a study that aims at…

Laughter versus Sympathy in Romola and Felix Holt

I want to start with a useful rather than a funny question posed by the critic Hilary M. Schor: 'What acts of information-organization do we perform on the Eliot career?'! The answer is possibly a succession of familiar base-touchings: Eliot's…

Review of Oscar Browning's Life of George Eliot

I would like to draw the attention of interested readers and George Eliot scholars to one of the earliest biographies of George Eliot, that written by Oscar Browning. It is a book which, apart from many interesting anecdotes of her life, might still…

Romola's Religious Experience

Romola can be seen as a landmark in George Eliot's career, when we bear in mind her striking confession to her second husband, John Cross: 'I began it a young woman -, I finished it an old woman' (Haight [1968] 362). Many of her readers, indeed, felt…

In Memorium: Andrew Brown (1950-2014)

Andrew Missak: Cleverley Brown died peacefully at home on 21 January 2014, days short of his sixty-fourth birthday, and only months after his retirement from the position of Development Director for Academic Publishing at Cambridge University Press.…

Review of George Eliot in Context by Margaret Harris

This collection offers a wide range of individual and rigorous criticism, with essays by the most informed specialists: amongst others, Margaret Harris on 'Biographies', John Rignall on 'Landscape' and 'Metropolitanism', Melissa Raines on 'Language',…

A Response

Against Marianne Burton's carefully argued case for the consummation of the Casaubon marriage are images and hints which I mentioned in The Appropriate Form: an Essay on the Novel and Particularities: Readings in George Eliot, especially: the…

Politics and Pastoral in Silas Marner

When eighteen-year-old surnameless Eppie stands by Silas Marner and against Godfrey Cass she joins a line of subversive children in Victorian fiction. Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre speaks out against her aunt; Dickens's Oliver Twist asks for more…

Supplementary Annotations to Daniel Deronda

The annotations to the first and second Penguin Classics editions of Daniel Deronda, by Barbara Hardy and Terence Cave respectively, and those of the Oxford World's Classics edition, by Graham Handley, weave a web like that attributed by Marvell to…

Annual Report - 2013

We can be pleased with the Fellowship's year in 2013. For some time now we have tried to add extra events to the well established series of meetings built up over the years. In 2013 we looked towards Coventry to provide a theme for the year, and were…

Casaubon's Impotence: A Literary Libel?

There are some literary hypotheses which so suit readers' impressions of a text that they become accepted almost as literary fact, as if they were stated in the text itself or had been confirmed by the author in an interview, letter or notebook. This…

Review of The Victorian Diary: Authorship and Emotional Labour by Anne-Marie Millim

The diary genre has been repeatedly explored both as a confessional, retrospective form of writing and 'as an inherently female genre' (p. 17). Refreshingly, Millim challenges these approaches by stressing not only the genre's multiplicity, but also…