Browse Documents (20 total)

  • Collection: George Eliot Review Issue 46: 2015

A Life Reclaimed: George Evans (1766-1857) of Norbury, Winster, Derby and Belper

George Evans, the elder brother of Robert Evans, George Eliot's father, has generally been disparaged as a drunkard who died young, but the following account of further research into his life aims to set the record straight. What is known for certain…

Review of George Eliot, Poetess by Wendy S. Williams

The word 'poetess' is contentious. For some it rankles, because the diminution of 'poet' is generally considered gratuitous, patronizing and offensive. More often than not, it belittles women writers and their work. Others, however, argue that it is…

Conference Report, George Eliot Conference, 2014: "Middlemarch"

Only by combining papers on Romola and Felix Holt. did the 2013 George Eliot Conference manage to attract a tolerably-sized audience; no such problems for the 2014 Conference on Middlemarch. This excellent event was oversubscribed and had to be moved…

Review of The Dog in the Dickensian Imagination by Beryl Gray

The nineteenth century saw great changes in the way the English thought about animals. This wasn't only because of Darwinian revelations; it was also the result of increased urbanization and industrialization. Less frequently confined to the farmyard…

Review of Anna Bentick, Reading of Silas Marner

Audiofile praises the 'pleasant cadence' of Anna Bentinck's voice in this recording of George Eliot's Wordsworthian masterpiece but, initially at least, I found her reading with its beautiful elocution sounded a bit too like Mrs Miniver (contrast…

Note: Alcharisi and the Redundant Definite Article

In critical and scholarly writing about Daniel Deronda, Daniel's mother, the Princess Leonora Halm-Eberstein, is all too often referred to as 'the Alcharisi'. In fact the definite article is only used on one occasion in conjunction with her former…

Review of George Eliot and Money: Economics, Ethics and Literature by Dermot Coleman

This is an important book which fills a gap in George Eliot studies by exploring with impressive authority the novelist's handling of money and economics in her life and work, on the premise that, for her, the economic was an essential constituent of…

Middlemarch and the Franco-Prussian War

By the early summer of 1870, George Eliot's work on Middlemarch, then consisting of the Vincy, Lydgate and Featherstone material, seemed to have stalled. In a journal entry of 20 May, George Eliot confessed that she was not hopeful about future work:…

Mr. Brooke's Thinking Organ

A scene in Middlemarch's thirtieth chapter describes how the creative process can slip out of a writer's control. A letter has arrived from Mr Casaubon's estranged cousin, Will Ladislaw, asking whether Will may visit Casaubon and Dorothea at their…

Review of Middlemarch: Critical Approaches to the Novel edited by Barbara Hardy

This book is a reprint of the 1967 edition published by the Athlone Press, one of '56 classic works of literary criticism' that Bloomsbury is reprinting from Athlone Press. This opportunity to revisit and reassess works that were highly regarded in…

Review of George Eliot's Feminism: 'The Right to Rebellion' by June Skye Szirotny

This luminous new work - dedicated to 'the millions of women deprived of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness by society's misogynist myths' - casts fresh light on George Eliot's feminism, which has often been the subject of controversy. 'I…

Japanese Branch Report 2014

On 29 November 2014, at the 18th General Meeting of the George Eliot Fellowship of Japan, three papers on George Eliot's novels were read in the morning session. In the afternoon, a symposium on Eliot's poems was held and in the evening session a…

Review of Sophie and the Sybil: A Victorian Romance by Patricia Duncker

George Eliot's afterlife in adaptations of and sequels to her works is thin compared to those of such contemporaries as Dickens and the Brontës, and similarly the number of novels in which she appears as a character is meagre. True, as early as 1881…

Elizabeth Gaskell in Middlemarch: Timothy Cooper, the Judgement of Solomon, and the Woman at the Window

In 'Silly Novels by Lady Novelists’ Gaskell and Harriet Martineau were the only living novelists George Eliot praised, and very briefly. George Eliot and Gaskell never met but corresponded, admired each other's work, and in several books George…

Address at the Westminster Abbey Wreath Laying, 2014

Every one of us attending this ceremony in Poets' Corner today is surely conscious of a great debt of gratitude to George Eliot for the legacy of her works. This year, partly due to the appearance of Rebecca Mead's memoir, one particular work -…

Felix Holt: The Radical and the Gusset of Cryptic Futurity

Most Victorian novels avail themselves of tidying codas in which the author projects the story into a future-turned-present and, counterpointed by wedding bells, maps out as close an approximation to the 'happily ever after' formula as the…

Silas Marner: George Eliot's Most Coleridgean Work?

In 1861 Henry Crabb Robinson compared George Eliot's Silas Marner with Coleridge's 'The Ancient Mariner'. He noted the novel's 'great affinity' with the poem: 'A little child, its mother having frozen to death at his solitary hovel, is taken in by…

Annual Report - 2014

No wonder we all felt exhausted by December! In preparing this report I have realized what an extraordinary number of things the Fellowship did last year; certainly the biggest workload since I became chairman but, one hopes, a year which brought new…

How Much Did Dorothea and Celia Know? Sexual Ignorance and Knowledge among Unmarried Girls in Middlemarch

Readers, in my experience, often make an assumption that unmarried girls in nineteenth-century novels know nothing about sex, and this seems to be particularly the case regarding Dorothea Brooke. Had she only known about sex, so the adage goes, she…