Browse Documents (9 total)

  • Collection: George Eliot Review Special Issue: 2009

Idlers and Collaborators: Enter the Dog

Both George Eliot and her older contemporary, Charles Dickens, introduced dogs into their fiction before introducing any into their homes. By the time Dickens was given the first of his many dogs he had invented Ponto, the sagacious pointer described…

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Death and Recollection: The Elegiac Dimension of Scenes of Clerical Life

Perversely, though perhaps appropriately for a paper on death, I want to begin at the end. George Eliot's last novel, Daniel Deronda, ends with a good death: that of Ezra Mordecai, dying with the arms of Mirah and Deronda around him, and feeling 'an…

'Indications that I can touch the hearts of my fellow men': Reading Scenes of Clerical Life from a Kleinian Psychoanalytic Perspective

George Eliot tentatively reflected in her journal that she might be touching the hearts of her fellow men in Scenes of Clerical Life. In this short paper, I explore with the aid of Kleinian psychoanalytical ideas what might be involved in such a…

Orphic Variations in Scenes of Clerical Life

What shall I do without Euridice? / Where shall I go without my love? / Euridice! Euridice! / Oh god! Answer me! / Yet I am true to you! / Euridice! Euridice! / Ah, I can find no more / help nor hope, / in the world or in the…

'The stream of human thought and deed' in 'Mr Gilfil's Love-Story'

In George Eliot: The Emergent Self, Ruby Redinger explains that it was through the demands of authorship that the woman Marian Evans 'evolved into another self, her writing self', essentially becoming George Eliot. Literary biographies of George…

Scenes of Clerical Life: George Eliot's Version of Conversion

Before the publication of Scenes of Clerical Life, few people would have thought that Miss Evans had all the qualities for writing fiction, or, what is more, that she would become a great novelist. She was in her late thirties when she came to…

How George Eliot Came to Write Fiction

We are celebrating one hundred and fifty years since the publication in volume form of George Eliot's first work of fiction, Scenes of Clerical Life, three stories printed first in Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine between January and November 1857, and…

Editor's Note

The Conference on 'George Eliot's Beginnings' at the Institute of English Studies on 1 November 2008 was organized by Rosemary Ashton, Beryl Gray and Barbara Hardy. The publication in volume form of Scenes of Clerical Life in 1858 was the point at…

Notes on Contributors 2009

Rosemary Ashton is Quain Professor of English Language and Literature at University College London. She is the author of acclaimed critical biographies of George Eliot (1996) and G. H. Lewes (1991). Her many publications on George Eliot include The…