Browse Documents (877 total)

'A Lifted Veil': A Missing George Eliot Portrait Rediscovered

Last summer, while compiling a checklist of art objects owned by the Clark Library, Renee Chin, a UCLA undergraduate and a Getty intern, discovered a portrait of George Eliot in the art storage room. Senior Library staff had not seen this portrait…

'Acting out' in Daniel Deronda

This short paper illustrates the way in which psychoanalytic perspectives can help us to understand the effect which a complex literary text like Daniel Deronda has on the reader. The two psychoanalytic perspectives used are Freud's insights into the…

'And her wings fall from her and she drops to the ground': Reading Eliot's Mr. Casaubon Through Benjamin Jowett's Phaedrus

In the scene describing Casaubon 's pathetic mental state prior to his heart attack in Chapter XXIX of Middlemarch, the narrator makes an enigmatic reference: 'Doubtless some ancient Greek has observed that behind the big mask and the…

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'Dear Cara': A New George Eliot Letter

At the beginning of the year a donation was made to Coventry's Herbert Art Gallery and Museum of a box of papers relating to the Fridlanders, a nineteenth-century Coventry watch-making family. Annie Fridlander was a friend of Charles and Caroline…

'Even our failures are a prophecy': The Mill on the Floss and the 1860s

My title comes from a poem, 'A Minor Prophet’, written by George Eliot in 1865, and I want to enlist its help in showing in this paper how the failures she experienced during the decade following the publication of The Mill on the Floss turned into…

'George Eliot'

LARGE woman soul, sure of unfading bays, It little boots o'er thy too early tomb To puff our little breaths of passing praise - Dead in the deepest of Midwinter's gloom, Ere thine own Autumn's mellow fruitage failed! We mourn a Larger Light, eclipsed…

'Good teaching': Adam Bede and Education

George Eliot's commitment to teaching motivates her writing from the first. Like many of those whose thinking was shaped by early nineteenth-century evangelicalism, she saw education as a vital responsibility. In 1847, when she was twenty-eight years…

'Grand and Vague': Why is Daniel Deronda about the Jews? (Prize Winning Essay)

'I am sure you are right to leave everything grand and vague', George Eliot's publisher wrote bemusedly to her about Daniel Deronda's Zionism (Letters VI: 272). In his 'Conversation' on Daniel Deronda, Henry James too, like many contemporary and…

'Hardy and Eliot': A Response

In the last issue of the Review, Nicola Harris, in her Fellowship Prize Essay, discussed the dif-ferent attitudes of Hardy and George Eliot to 'moral perception'.' In the course of her argu-ment she refers to an article of mine, published several…

'Heard but Not Seen': An Anthology of Victorian Childhood devised and presented by Gabriel Woolf and Rosalind Shanks, Nuneaton Town Hall and Warwick Arts Centre, 17 and 18 April 1997

This year's performance of readings was subtitled A Victorian Edition of Children's Hour, and was intended for adults. The programme was constructed round the framework of the child-hood of Tom and Maggie from The Mill on the Floss and included…

'Hetty had never read a novel': Adam Bede and Realism

It is not just the famous Chapter 17, 'In Which the Story Pauses a Little', which makes George Eliot's Adam Bede one of the first candidates for any discussion of the tenets and aims of nineteenth-century literary realism. The question is opened in…

'In isolation human power is limited, in combination it is infinite': Tracing Ludwig Feuerbach's Essence of Christianity through Daniel Deronda

Written between January 1873 and June 1876, Daniel Deronda was George Eliot's final and most ambitious novel. The Jewish-born, later excommunicated Dutch philosopher Baruch Spinoza, whose Ethics Eliot translated in 1856, would perhaps seem the more…

'Indications that I can touch the hearts of my fellow men': Reading Scenes of Clerical Life from a Kleinian Psychoanalytic Perspective

George Eliot tentatively reflected in her journal that she might be touching the hearts of her fellow men in Scenes of Clerical Life. In this short paper, I explore with the aid of Kleinian psychoanalytical ideas what might be involved in such a…

'Listening': A Poem Inspired by Middlemarch

Listening to silence
on its other side
hearing the grass grow
the beat of a bird's heart
the fall of a star
Shall 1 die of the roar
waiting for silence
to break - like glass?

'My Own Dear Heart's Ease': George Eliot's Coventry Friend, Caroline (Cara) Bray

In September 1842 Mary Ann Evans wrote a short but illuminating letter to her Coventry friend Cara Bray: My own dear Heart's Ease [it was not unusual for her to give her closest friends the name of a flower as she had done this on several occasions…

'Pier-glass Imagery' in Middlemarch

In 'George Eliot's Middlemarch as a translation of Spinoza's Ethics' (GER 40), Miriam Henson refers to the author's use of 'pier glass' imagery to illustrate her theory of morality and to show how an individual looks at the world from his self as the…

'That Most Despicable Travesty of a Woman': Eliza Lynn Linton and Elma Stuart

The George Eliot Collection in Nuneaton Library includes a previously unpublished letter written by Elma Stuart, one of George Eliot's greatest admirers. It was written in response to a critical and spiteful article about George Eliot in 1895 by…

'That Vandyke Duchess': Portraiture and Epic in Daniel Deronda

Portraits abound in Daniel Deronda - not only on the drawing-room walls of the Grandcourts and Mallingers, and in the 'grave Holbein faces' of the Meyrick family lithographs, but also in the actions and physiognomies of the novel's characters…

'The Antigone and its Moral': George Eliot's Antigonean Considerations

As early as 1856 with the publication of the essay, 'The Antigone and Its Moral' George Eliot turned her literary attention to the Sophoclean figure of Antigone. Scholars such as Gerhard Joseph' and David Moldstad' have enumerated Eliot's multiple…

'The Dead Hand' in Middlemarch

Edward Casaubon dies early in Book V of Middlemarch. Occurring where it does, it effec-tively bisects the novel; and indeed, it is a pivotal event in Dorothea's history. His will erects her central dilemma. She faces a choice, forced upon her by her…

'The generations of ants and beavers': Classical Economics and Animals in The Mill on the Floss

Before any named characters find their way into The Mill on the Floss, the narrator introduces us to two sets of animals (aside from a human driver): white ducks dipping their heads into the stream and horses pulling a covered wagon. The ducks are…

'The stream of human thought and deed' in 'Mr Gilfil's Love-Story'

In George Eliot: The Emergent Self, Ruby Redinger explains that it was through the demands of authorship that the woman Marian Evans 'evolved into another self, her writing self', essentially becoming George Eliot. Literary biographies of George…

'The Woman at the Window'

Dear Editors May I write a postscript to Terence R. Wright's review of Perspectives on Self and Community in George Eliot: Dorothea's Window in your last number? He says I 'come down strongly on lesser critics who make the mistake of locating…

'There is no such thing as natural barrenness in natural women': Childless Marriages in Silas Marner and "The Lifted Veil"

'There is no such thing as natural barrenness in natural women' wrote the eminent French psychologist Eugene Becklard in the 1840s, and, in general, physicians agreed with him. Certainly in mid-nineteenth-century literature children were the sine qua…

'Tied to my heart by a cord which can never be broken': George Eliot and her Sister Chrissey

Christiana Evans, always known as Chrissey, was the first child of Robert Evans's marriage to Christiana Pearson of Astley, near Nuneaton, and she was born, as were Isaac and Mary Ann, at Arbury (now South) Farm on the Arbury estate in 1814. When the…