Browse Documents (18 total)

  • Tags: felix holt

Radical Politics in the 1860s: The Writing of Felix Holt

While Felix Holt the Radical was being written there was a transformation in the atmosphere surrounding further parliamentary reform in Britain. In March 1865, when George Eliot began the novel, the Liberal Prime Minister Palmerston remained cautious…

Felix Holt and 'a fine sight of lawsuits'

During the festivities surrounding the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death, much was said about his Warwickshire roots, and commentators noted, not for the first time, his use of Warwickshire dialect. The same is frequently said about George…

The Radical Candidature: Harold Transome's Political Motivation in Felix Holt

In late 1832 Great Britain was preparing for a special General Election. A Reform Bill passed in June had extended voting rights to the middle class, and parliamentary constituencies were re-distributed to enfranchise some of the larger industrial…

Felix Holt: The Radical and the Gusset of Cryptic Futurity

Most Victorian novels avail themselves of tidying codas in which the author projects the story into a future-turned-present and, counterpointed by wedding bells, maps out as close an approximation to the 'happily ever after' formula as the…

Laughter versus Sympathy in Romola and Felix Holt

I want to start with a useful rather than a funny question posed by the critic Hilary M. Schor: 'What acts of information-organization do we perform on the Eliot career?'! The answer is possibly a succession of familiar base-touchings: Eliot's…

The Two Felixes: Narratorial Irony and the Question of Radicalism in Felix Holt and 'Address to Working Men, by Felix Holt'

In this characterization of Dorothea by the narrator of Middlemarch (1871-2), the 'Great' Reform Act of 1832 is posited as a dividing line between two phases of history, so distinct as to have separate spheres of interest and judgements of normality.…

Review of Felix Holt, the Radical adapted by Michael Eaton and directed by Lucy Bailey. BBC Radio 4, June-July 2007

Felix Holt, with its large cast of characters, and above all with its notoriously complicated legal plot, presents a real challenge when adapting and reducing it for a three hour, serialized radio dramatization. Michael Eaton is to be congratulated…

Legitimate Plots, Private Lots in Felix Holt and Daniel Deronda

A preoccupation with the idea of home was central to George Eliot's fiction from its beginnings until its end. In Felix Holt and Daniel Deronda, however, this theme is developed in terms that involve legal complexities that have embroiled her…

Review of The Broadview Edition of Felix Holt, the Radical. Ed. William Baker and Kenneth Womack

William Baker and Kenneth Womack's Felix Holt is part of the relatively recent Broadview Literary Texts series, a Canadian-based series that seeks to publish recognized canonical texts alongside less well known texts from literary history. With that…

Silas Marner and Felix Holt: Affinities and Antitheses

At first sight there seems little to link Silas Marner with Felix Holt. There are certainly con-trasts, but it is harder to find similarities between a short pastoral idyll and a complex politi-cal work that looks forward to Middlemarch rather than…

Towards a Critical Reputation: Henry James on Felix Holt, the Radical

A productive starting point for a critical evaluation of Henry James's criticism of George Eliot's fiction is his unsigned review of Felix Holt, the Radical, which, as his first piece of criticism on her, is perhaps itself most usefully read against…

The Politics of Religion in Felix Holt

In chapter 3 of Felix Holt, the narrator gives an account of the 'social changes in Treby parish', including the altered character of Trebian Dissent. It had been of a quiescent, well-to-do kind, represented architecturally by a small venerable,…

Review of Felix Holt, the Radical. Two new editions, Ed. A.G. can den Broek and Lynda Mugglestone

With Romola, Felix Holt, the Radical has generally proved to be George Eliot's least appreci-ated novel. Romola used to be safely categorized as 'smelling of the lamp', while Felix Holt was awkwardly 'political'. Despite a continuing critical unease…

Study Group Notes: Felix Holt and Daniel Deronda

The Study Group, which had begun with Middlemarch, ended with Felix Holt and Daniel Deronda. During the discussions it became clear that both eponymous "heroes" were less than satisfactory as presented to the reader, but it was not easy to say why…

Review of World's Classics Series: Felix Holt ed. by Fred C. Thomson

If one cannot afford the splendid Clarendon Editions of George Eiot's novels. the World's Classics editions are a very good second best. They are second -best, however, only in their format, since the text of the novels is the same. For the finer…

Mrs. Transome and 'Desecrated Sanctities'

As George Eliot's Introduction to Felix Holt would lead one to expect, the crux of the tragedy which this novel embodies is the "pity and terror" evoked by the "downfall of blindly-climbing hopes", rather than mere peripeteia - the 'discovery' of…

The Role of Popular Medicine in The Mill on the Floss, Silas Marner, and Felix Holt

More than eight years before George Eliot began her research into medicine for Middlemarch, she wrote of characters who, although not professionals, were strongly influenced by the interest they had in medicine. In each of her English novels…

Coincidence and Consequence Relative to a Scene in Felix Holt

Simultaneity or near simultaneity of events is sometimes used by George Eliot to heighten contrast. There could hardly be closer proximity of scenes for such effects than that of ‘The Two Bed-Chambers’ in Adam Bede. In Daniel Deronda the…