Browse Documents (32 total)

  • Tags: john rignall

Death and Recollection: The Elegiac Dimension of Scenes of Clerical Life

Perversely, though perhaps appropriately for a paper on death, I want to begin at the end. George Eliot's last novel, Daniel Deronda, ends with a good death: that of Ezra Mordecai, dying with the arms of Mirah and Deronda around him, and feeling 'an…

Review of Writing the Stage Coach Nation: Locality on the Move in Nineteenth-Century British Literature by Ruth Liversey

Starting from the observation that so many of the major Victorian novels are set, not in the railway age in which they were written, but in the horse-drawn world of the previous generation, a world that is 'just past', this fine study explores the…

Review of The Transferred Life of George Eliot by Philip Davis

There have been several good new biographies of George Eliot in recent years but none quite like this. Davis's subtle and searching analysis focuses almost exclusively on the writing as he traces the complex ways in which the experience of Mary Ann,…

Editors' Note

This year's issue of the George Eliot Review is the first for more than two decades that has not been shaped by the editorial hand of Beryl Gray. Beryl joined Graham Handley as co-editor in 1992 and continued until 2015, playing the leading role in…

Conference Report, Annual George Eliot Conference University of London, 2015: "Daniel Deronda"

The conference opened with a characteristically rich and incisive paper by Barbara Hardy (Birkbeck), 'Re-Reading Daniel Deronda', which, sadly, was the last she was to deliver (see Obituary and Tributes elsewhere in this issue). She began by drawing…

Two Sequels to Daniel Deronda

The two sequels of my title are a seven page satirical squib in Mr Punch's Pocket-Book for 1877 entitled 'Daniel Deronda, Book IX', and a short novel or long story of around 50,000 words - much the same length as ' Mr Gilfil's Love-Story' -…

Notes on Contributors 2016

Isobel Armstrong is Professor Emerita of English at Birkbeck University of London. She has published widely on nineteenth-century literature and culture, and her books include Victorian Poetry: Poetry, Poetics and Politics (1996), The Radical…

Note: Alcharisi and the Redundant Definite Article

In critical and scholarly writing about Daniel Deronda, Daniel's mother, the Princess Leonora Halm-Eberstein, is all too often referred to as 'the Alcharisi'. In fact the definite article is only used on one occasion in conjunction with her former…

Review of George Eliot and Money: Economics, Ethics and Literature by Dermot Coleman

This is an important book which fills a gap in George Eliot studies by exploring with impressive authority the novelist's handling of money and economics in her life and work, on the premise that, for her, the economic was an essential constituent of…

Middlemarch and the Franco-Prussian War

By the early summer of 1870, George Eliot's work on Middlemarch, then consisting of the Vincy, Lydgate and Featherstone material, seemed to have stalled. In a journal entry of 20 May, George Eliot confessed that she was not hopeful about future work:…

Review of Heathen and Outcast: Scenes in the Life of George Eliot by Robert Muscutt

This fictionalized version of George Eliot's life between 1841 and 1854 takes as its starting point Edith Simcox's account of visiting the Midlands after the novelist's death and collecting material for a biography which, in the end, was never…

Review of Reading for Our Time: 'Adam Bede' and 'Middlemarch' Revisited by J. Hillis Miller

As his sub-title indicates, J. Hillis Miller is returning in his latest book to the study of George Eliot, bringing to bear on Adam Bede and Middlemarch the insight and erudition acquired in a long and distinguished career as a scholar and critic. He…

Review of George Eliot: Interviews and Recollections edited by K. K. Collins

In his introduction to this fascinating collection of accounts and comments by those who met George Eliot, K. K. Collins points out that modem biographies draw on about forty recollections that have come to form a canon of reminiscence. To this canon…

Review of George Eliot, European Novelist by John Rignall

On the opening page of this series of connected essays, John Rignall points out that 'George Eliot's readers and reviewers took it for granted that her novels belonged to a European tradition of fiction'. When Leavis conscripted her into his new…

Review of Charles Dickens by Michael Slater

On the first page of this splendid new biography, Dickens is cited referring to his own earliest writings as 'certain tragedies achieved at the mature age of eight or ten and represented with great applause to overflowing nurseries'. The genially…

Editor's Note

1. The articles in this issue by Dinah Birch, Rachel Bowlby, Barbara Hardy, and Josephine McDonagh were originally delivered as papers at the Adam Bede conference held at the Institute of English Studies, University of London, on 7 November 2009. 2.…

Toast to the Immortal Memory of George Eliot, 2008

I have attended several birthday luncheons over the years and I am very pleased and honoured to have been invited this year to propose the toast. The fact that this is a birthday celebration has prompted me to wonder how George Eliot herself was wont…

Review of 142 Strand: A Radical Address in Victorian London by Rosemary Ashton and George Eliot in Germany, 1854-55 by Gerlinde Röder-Bolton

The outlines of Marian Evans's life in the years immediately preceding her emergence as George Eliot are well-known-her work for the Westminster Review, her relationships with Chapman, Spencer and Lewes, and then her departure with the latter to…

George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 2005: "George Eliot and Weimar: 'an affinity for what the world calls "dull places'"

One hundred and fifty years ago this year, in June and July 1855, the future George Eliot published two articles in Fraser 's Magazine about her experiences in Weimar with G. H. Lewes between August and November 1854: 'Three Months in Weimar' and…

Review of The Mill on the Floss: George Eliot by Alain Jumeau and Le Moulin sure la Floss trans. Alain Jumeau

Writing to her first French translator, François d' Albert-Durade, in 1865, George Eliot remarked on how little known his translations appeared to be in France, since she was always being approached by people who wanted to translate her works into…

Review of George Eliot and Schiller by Deborah Guth and Dutch Readings of George Eliot 1856-1885 by Diederik L. van Werven

In their very different ways these two studies contribute significantly to our understanding of George Eliot's place in the wider context of European literary culture. Diederik van Werven examines the nineteenth-century reception of her novels in the…

Editors' Note

We wish to correct the following typographical errors that occurred in June Skye Szirotny's 'Edward Casaubon and Herbert Spencer' (George Eliot Review No. 32 [2001], pp. 29-43): p. 31 , I. 31 after ). insert [sic ] p. 34, I. 11 for our read our p.…

Review of George Eliot and the British Empire by Nancy Henry

In this fascinating and forcefully argued study, Nancy Henry addresses the kind of subject that has become the preserve of post-colonial criticism but does so in a way that challenges com-monly held assumptions about the relations between empire and…

Review of Oxford Reader's Companion to George Eliot. Ed. John Rignall

For a reader of George Eliot, opening this Companion may be a bit like opening a box of chocolates. There is a pause as one wonders where to begin, but once begun, it is difficult to stop tasting and savouring the contents. The articles are written…