Browse Documents (50 total)

  • Tags: middlemarch

Review of The World of Mr. Casaubon: Britain's Wars of Mythography, 1700-1870 by Colin Kidd

The title ofthis book is interesting, as the subtitle describes what it is about but the main title refers to a fictional character from Middlemarch, part of a novel recently voted the greatest in English. Such a title makes the book much more…

A Being Apart': Sympathy and Distance in Middlemarch (Prize Essay)

Moral philosophers have long observed that human beings strain to feel compassionate concern for people whose lives are distant from their own. Aristotle proposed in the Rhetoric that we tend to pity people who resemble us in age, character, habits,…

Middlemarch: Three Italian Journeys

In Middlemarch, Dorothea' s intense moment of disillusionment in Rome has been generally traced to Eliot's own Italian journey of 1860, when, as Gordon s. Haight notes (324), the disappointment in many sights of the Eternal City paralleled her…

Between 'Silly Novels' and Vegetation Myths: George Eliot's Subversive Use of the Two Suitors Convention in Middlemarch

'Silly Novels by Lady Novelists', George Eliot's vitriolic overview of popular novels of the 1850s, which is the source of the mock-recipe above, was published in 1856, shortly before Eliot started writing her first work of fiction, 'The Sad Fortunes…

Riding Horses in Middlemarch

'George Eliot's Peculiar Passion' the title of an article by Sarah Wintle, refers to the belief expressed by Katherine Mansfield in a letter to her husband, John Middleton Murry, that George Eliot had a 'peculiar passion for horses'. At the beginning…

Review of Middlemarch in Spring by Allen Shearer and Claudia Stevens

George Eliot consistently paid meticulous attention to matters of 'voice', typically providing precise descriptions of her characters' voices, whether speaking or singing. Dorothea Brooke's harp-like voice is, of course, one of the qualities that…

Conference Report, George Eliot Conference, 2014: "Middlemarch"

Only by combining papers on Romola and Felix Holt. did the 2013 George Eliot Conference manage to attract a tolerably-sized audience; no such problems for the 2014 Conference on Middlemarch. This excellent event was oversubscribed and had to be moved…

Middlemarch and the Franco-Prussian War

By the early summer of 1870, George Eliot's work on Middlemarch, then consisting of the Vincy, Lydgate and Featherstone material, seemed to have stalled. In a journal entry of 20 May, George Eliot confessed that she was not hopeful about future work:…

Review of Middlemarch: Critical Approaches to the Novel edited by Barbara Hardy

This book is a reprint of the 1967 edition published by the Athlone Press, one of '56 classic works of literary criticism' that Bloomsbury is reprinting from Athlone Press. This opportunity to revisit and reassess works that were highly regarded in…

Elizabeth Gaskell in Middlemarch: Timothy Cooper, the Judgement of Solomon, and the Woman at the Window

In 'Silly Novels by Lady Novelists’ Gaskell and Harriet Martineau were the only living novelists George Eliot praised, and very briefly. George Eliot and Gaskell never met but corresponded, admired each other's work, and in several books George…

How Much Did Dorothea and Celia Know? Sexual Ignorance and Knowledge among Unmarried Girls in Middlemarch

Readers, in my experience, often make an assumption that unmarried girls in nineteenth-century novels know nothing about sex, and this seems to be particularly the case regarding Dorothea Brooke. Had she only known about sex, so the adage goes, she…

Review of Reading for Our Time: 'Adam Bede' and 'Middlemarch' Revisited by J. Hillis Miller

As his sub-title indicates, J. Hillis Miller is returning in his latest book to the study of George Eliot, bringing to bear on Adam Bede and Middlemarch the insight and erudition acquired in a long and distinguished career as a scholar and critic. He…

Review of The Business of the Novel: Economics, Aesthetics and the Case of Middlemarch by Simon R. Frost

With excellent research available on the publication history of Middlemarch, including work by John Sutherland, N. N. Feltes, Carol Martin, David Finkelstein and others, it may seem surprising that an entire book has now been devoted to the topic.…

Review of Dorothea's Daughter and Other Nineteenth-Century Postscripts by Barbara Hardy

This book is the fruit of many years of thought about nine great novels. Barbara Hardy does not present us with a series of sequels, though we do learn of things that happened after the action of the novels ended. Rather, she offers a set of…

Narration in Middlemarch Revisited

In a previously published article entitled 'The Role of the Narrator in George Eliot's Novels', I attempted to defend her narrator (particularly in regard to Middlemarch) from a variety of critical attacks. The main points of my argument were: (I)…

'Pier-glass Imagery' in Middlemarch

In 'George Eliot's Middlemarch as a translation of Spinoza's Ethics' (GER 40), Miriam Henson refers to the author's use of 'pier glass' imagery to illustrate her theory of morality and to show how an individual looks at the world from his self as the…

The Representation of Place in Middlemarch

Critics in the past have tended to refer to the rootedness of characters in George Eliot's novels. This is particularly true of Adam Bede, where the naturalistic roots of characters are often explicitly stated, such as when Dinah affirms 'I'm not…

Notes on Middlemarch and Romola

Rereading Middlemarch and Romola recently, I was struck by some unrecorded musical and literary parallels, none of them substantial enough (or indeed sufficiently interconnected) to be woven into an integrated article, but having, I hope, enough…

George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 2008: "Who was Mrs Nassau Senior? Was She the Inspiration for George Eliot's Dorothea in Middlemarch?"

Who was Jeanie Senior before Octavia Hill introduced her to George Eliot in October 1866? Born Jeanie Hughes in 1828, the cherished daughter and only sister of seven brothers, she had started life as a happier Maggie Tulliver - keenly alive, with a…

Review of Eliot's Middlemarch: Reader's Guide by Josie Billington

This new 'Reader's Guide' successfully complements two preceding works that were written for the same purpose of providing information and interpretation for readers of Middlemarch in a compact form: those by Karen Chase for Cambridge University…

George Eliot's Middlemarch as a Translation of Spinoza's Ethics

In 1846 John Chapman of Newgate Street published a translation of David Strauss's Das Leben Jesu. Although no translator was accredited, this book was the result of two years' arduous work by Mary Ann Evans, the woman who would later achieve renown…

Review of Middlemarch in the Twenty-first Century ed. by Karen Chase

This set of eight original essays engages afresh with a novel that many readers might claim to know well, in such a way as to make 'the lights and shadows ... fall with a certain difference' (chap. xxi). Karen Chase is well-known for her own studies…

Aspects of 'Indefiniteness' in Middlemarch

In this article I will be teasing out the significance of the various uses and senses of 'indefiniteness' in Middlemarch. Whether it is in relationships between other characters, or between Dorothea and other characters, or between Dorothea and…

Review of George Eliot by Tim Dolin and Middlemarch edited by Gregory Maertz

Both books under review appear in series that aim to give new currency to texts and authors by the provision of critical and cultural context. The implied audience is not simply the old 'sixth form and junior undergraduate' cohorts: there is a…

Basil and Vampire: Fears of Dissection in Middlemarch

In the final chapter of George Eliot's Middlemarch, after describing the death of Lydgate and Rosamond's subsequent second marriage to 'an elderly and wealthy physician', the narrator tells us that Lydgate once called her his basil plant; and when…