Browse Documents (15 total)

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How George Eliot Came to Write Fiction

We are celebrating one hundred and fifty years since the publication in volume form of George Eliot's first work of fiction, Scenes of Clerical Life, three stories printed first in Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine between January and November 1857, and…

George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 2010: "The Mill on the Floss and the Difficulties of Relationships"

By late 1859, when she had almost finished writing The Mill on the Floss, George Eliot was still unsure of its final title. The working title was 'Sister Maggie', which was particularly appropriate to the first two thirds of the novel, where interest…

Review of 142 Strand: A Radical Address in Victorian London by Rosemary Ashton and George Eliot in Germany, 1854-55 by Gerlinde Röder-Bolton

The outlines of Marian Evans's life in the years immediately preceding her emergence as George Eliot are well-known-her work for the Westminster Review, her relationships with Chapman, Spencer and Lewes, and then her departure with the latter to…

Review of George Eliot by Rosemary Ashton

Oxford's publication of 'Bite-sized biographies of Britain's most fascinating historical figures' brings to mind Pascal's famous apology for the length of his letter: 'I have not had time to make it shorter'. Would Rosemary Ashton, who has written…

Review of George Eliot and Nineteenth-Century Psychology: Exploring the Unmapped Country by Michael Davis

Michael Davis packs a dense yet deft discussion of George Eliot's relationship with the scientific theories of mind of her contemporaries into this short book. Revisiting the novels and essays, and to a lesser extent the letters, he adds to our…

George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 2006: "Glimpses of Life at 142 Strand"

1. John Chapman and the Strand in 1847 On 24 July 1847 the following advertisement appeared in the weekly periodical, the Athenaeum: MR CHAPMAN, Bookseller and Publisher, begs to announce that he has REMOVED his Business from 121 Newgate Street, to…

Toast to the Immortal Memory of George Eliot, 2005

Ladies and gentlemen, this is a special year because it is 150 years since George Eliot and G. H. Lewes began to live together openly. 22 November 1854 was her thirty-fifth birthday. Where were she and Lewes? What were they doing? They were in…

Review of George Eliot: A Life by Rosemary Ashton

Fifty years after John Cross's hagiographic George Eliot's Life as Related in her Letters and Journals (1885), Gordon Haight planned a more forthright biography but first found that it would be necessary to re-edit those letters and journals…

Review of Impressions of Theophrastus Such Two new editions, edited by Nancy Henry and by D.J. Enright

George Eliot's last published work, Impressions of Theophrastus Such (1879), has hither-to not been much read or attended to by readers, critics, or even scholars. Now two edi-tions have appeared almost simultaneously, both annotated and furnished…

Review of Versatile Victorian: Selected Critical Writings of George Henry Lewes edited by Rosemary Ashton

This admirable collection, its succinct introduction indicating the range and quality of Lewes's criticism, is a feast This is the place to taste Lewes selectively. I like to think: that it is true that the best part of an author's life lies in…

Review of George Eliot: Selected Critical Writings edited by Rosemary Ashton

If deciding whether Eliot was novelist or poet is less difficult than a similar decision with regard to Hardy, the common reader (and more particularly the paperback pur-chaser) has been at a considerable disadvantage in assessing how to appraise…

Review of G.H. Lewes: A Life by Rosemary Ashton

For a very long time, George Henry Lewes's reputation has centred on the fact that, for the last 25 years of his life, he was George Eliot's partner. Not a vast number of people have cared to know very much about him beyond an idea, perhaps, that he…

George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 1990: "George Eliot's 'Husband' - Writing the Life of G.H. Lewes"

In July 1990 I finished writing a biography of G.H. Lewes, which will be published by Oxford University Press in September 1991. There could be no better subject to have than Lewes (1817-1878). He is, of course, best remembered as the faithful…

Address at the Westminster Abbey Wreath Laying, 1989

One of the Shakespeare quotations most frequently used by George Eliot in her writings is an otherwise little-known phrase from As You Like It, Act 1 scene iii, where Rosalind, about to leave the court for the Forest of Arden, says, 'O, how full of…

Review of George Eliot by Rosemary Ashton

This is an admirable introduction to the works of George Eliot, succinctly written, with a fine summary of the influences which shaped the great novelist in her early years and in the formative period of her life as translator and journalist. Small…