Browse Documents (56 total)

  • Tags: graham handley

The Quality of Humour in Brother Jacob

'Brother Jacob' was written in 1860. but not published until 1864. some months after Romola had completed its run in the Cornhill Magazine. At first sight it appears to be an undistinguished piece of work, with the omniscient author well in evidence.…

Review of Frederic Harrison: The Vocations of a Positivist by Martha S. Vogeler

This book, the result of more than half a lifetime's research, provides a much-needed insight into the nature of English Positivism and one of its leading disciples, Frederic Harrison. It opens excitingly with the twenty-three year old Harrison…

Daniel Deronda: The Clarendon Edition of the Novels of George Eliot edited by Graham Handley

In writing Daniel Deronda George Eliot hoped 'to rouse the imagination of men and women to a vision of human claims in those races of their fellow-men who most differ from them in customs and beliefs'. Typically, her aspiration was suffused with…

Review of Those of Us Who Loved Her by Kathleen Adams

This book, issued in the Centenary Year, makes no pretence to being academic, although in fact there is evidence of considerable research, particularly of a local nature. The men associated with Marian Evans throughout her career from provincial…

A Tribute to Barbara Hardy

Barbara and I were close friends for over fifty years. She was the external examiner for my doctoral thesis in 1962, and from then on we met three or four times a year. I had previously reviewed The Novels of George Eliot and been impressed by the…

Review of George Eliot in Society: Travels Abroad and Sundays at the Priory by Kathleen McCormack

This is a welcome and wholly worthwhile extension of the author's George Eliot's English Travels: Composite Characters and Coded Communication (2005), a densely written and stimulating examination of places and people in Eliot's life which have some…

Review of George Eliot (Routledge Guides to Literature) by Nancy Henry

The physical format of this important overview is unattractive, the print small, with some forty-eight lines to the page giving the impression of overpacking to keep the cost down. This companion to George Eliot studies - it is in fact more than a…

George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 2007: "Scenes and After"

The Folio Society's cosmetic edition of George Eliot's fiction, which was published in 1999, has no place on any spine of its seven-volume set for Scenes of Clerical Life. A search of the actual texts, however, reveals George Eliot's first published…

Review of Identifying the Remains: George Eliot's Death in the London Religious Press by K.K. Collins

This is a detailed examination of the various religious-based obituaries which followed George Eliot's death in December 1880. It exposes misinformation, largely biographical, examines bias, confusion, open and concealed concerns, direct, responsible…

Review of Broadview Edition of Adam Bede, edited by Mary Waldron

This Broadview edition of Adam Bede has a biographical and critical introduction, appropriately integrating G. H. Lewes into its discourse, and useful essays on some of the themes of the novel, - Religion, Love, Rank and Status. There are short…

Review of George Eliot's Dialogue with John Milton by Anna K. Nardo

This, despite some blemishes and limitations indicated in passing below, is an examination of selected writings by Milton, the stories about him, and the engagement with his life and works which is reflected in the life and works of George Eliot.…

Daniel Deronda (BBC 1) and George Eliot: A Scandalous Life (BBC 2)

The classic novel provides a tempting invitation for the contemporary film-maker: almost certainly it will have period costume, indoor amusements - preferably a dance, even better a ball - lavish, preferably country-house settings, consonant with…

Middlemarch and Belinda

Middlemarch and Rhoda Broughton's Belinda (1883) have often been cited as benchmarks in the much wider debate concerning Mark Pattison and his wife Emily Francis, later Lady Dilke. Among other novels with alleged Pattison derivations are W. H.…

Review of The Folio Society Edition of George Eliot's Fiction

The Millennium has provided a number of reasons for celebration, but for members of the Fellowship and admirers of George Eliot generally the year 2000 will see two signal recogni-tions of her status. Before it is out, the Oxford Reader’s Companion…

Review of Sisters in Literature: Female Sexuality in 'Antigone', 'Middlemarch', 'Howard's End', and 'Women in Love' by Masako Hirai

While the main theme of this book is clear and easily grasped, there is an unevenness about the treatment which at times is disconcerting. Biography and critical argument sit uneasily together, some of the statements are outside the frame of current…

Mathilde Blind

The first titles in the Eminent Women Series published in 1883 by W. H. AlIen included stud-ies of Emily Bronte and George Sand (Margaret Fuller, Maria Edgeworth, Elizabeth Fry, and Harriet Martineau would be in the next wave) as well as Mathilde…

Review of The Quest for Anonymity: The Novels of George Eliot by Henry Alley

This book derives from half a lifetime's teaching and the author's obvious affinity for George Eliot. It is earnest, sometimes engaging, often off centre. It also exists in a kind of time-warp, somewhere in the 1960s in terms of tone and stance,…

A Forgotten Critic: Abba Goold Woolson's George Eliot and her Heroines: A Study

I feel that one should draw attention to the fact that in 1886 an American woman established certain emphases which succeeding critics followed, developed and extended in the twentieth century. This small book (published by Harper Brothers, New York)…

Address at the Westminster Abbey Wreath Laying, 1996

It has always seemed to me, and doubtless to many others, that some of the most moving and evocative words ever written by George Eliot occur near the beginning of the third chapter of her last novel, Daniel Deronda: A human life, I think, should be…

Review of George Eliot: A Biography by Frederick Karl

This is a massive study, what the author calls 'a topic for a biography' (x). It occupied four years of his time, during which he obviously saturated himself in his subject, her period, her circle, her letters and all the contiguous material…

The Two Georges and the Gunner

Edward Bruce Hamley (1824-93) was a dedicated professional soldier, a military histori-an and theorist and a man of varied literary interests. He was a member of a distinguished Cornish family, and was educated at Bodmin Grammar School and the Royal…

Review of The Real Life of Mary Ann Evans: George Eliot, Her Letters and Fiction by Rosemarie Bodenheimer

This is an important biographical and critical study which takes for its starting point George Eliot's view in 1879 that 'The best history of a writer is contained in his writings - these are his chief actions' (The George Eliot Letters, VII, 230).…

Charles Christian Hennell and George Eliot: Human and Narrative Affinities

On 13 November 1841 the twenty-two year old Marian Evans wrote to her then mentor Maria Lewis 'My whole soul has been engrossed in the most interesting of all inquiries for the last few days, and to what results my thoughts may lead, I know not -…

Review of Romola (The Clarendon Edition) Edited by Andrew Brown

George Eliot wrote of Romola in 1877 that she 'could swear by every sentence as having been written with my best blood.' Romola was the only historical novel she ever wrote, and the editor of the Clarendon edition, Andrew Brown, describes it as 'the…

London Branch Report 1993

This is our farewell note as officers of the London Branch. We resigned in April, Michael Forrest our Secretary in March. We understand that the Fellowship Council has approved Elizabeth Gundrey's ideas for a number of events to be held in the future…