Browse Documents (23 total)

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Review of Forms of Feeling in Victorian Fiction by Barbara Hardy

The art of representing feeling within a fictional character, and of eliciting response from the reader, was well understood by the great Victorian novelists. Their methods were so successful that the characters they created and the emotional…

Review of The Madwoman in the Attic by Sandra M. Gilbert and Susan Gubar

Virginia Woolf once wrote that spontaneous criticism, uttered as one tossed the finished book ‘into the next armchair with an exclamation of horror or delight’, is the most telling. On finishing The Madwoman in the Attic by Sandra M. Gilbert and…

Gwendolyn's Story from Daniel Deronda (Audio Casette), read by Gabriel Woolf and Rosalind Shanks

In 1902, the essayist, Leslie Stephen, wrote that Daniel Deronda was 'two stories put side by side' and the 'Gwendolen Story' taken by itself was a 'masterly piece of social satire'. In his biography of George Eliot, Gordon Haight makes a general…

'Heard but Not Seen': An Anthology of Victorian Childhood devised and presented by Gabriel Woolf and Rosalind Shanks, Nuneaton Town Hall and Warwick Arts Centre, 17 and 18 April 1997

This year's performance of readings was subtitled A Victorian Edition of Children's Hour, and was intended for adults. The programme was constructed round the framework of the child-hood of Tom and Maggie from The Mill on the Floss and included…

Review of Middlemarch: A Study of Provincial Life by George Eliot with an Introduction by E.S. Shaffer

I read Middlemarch for the first time in the Everyman's Library edition of 1930, a trim book in two volumes with a note by Leslie Stephen by way of Introduction. The note was taken from the Essay on George Eliot in Hours in a Library, and is less…

Review of Meriden: Its People and Houses Part I by Doreen M.K. Agutter

This publication, said to be 'the first book ever written about Meriden', has come to our attention because of 'The George Eliot Connection' and because it was researched and written by a member of the George Eliot Fellowship. The historical…

Enter the Aunts - The 1990 Readings by Gabriel Woolf

A mind had certainly been present in choosing the programme, which provided a perfect blend of George Eliot and The Others. The bickering aunts from The Mill on the Floss seem to be everyone's favourites. George Eliot no doubt drew on her memories of…

Review of World's Classics Series: Middlemarch ed. By David Carroll

"It is a curious fact that when a writer has attained to a certain eminence, we English cease to bother ourselves about him. There he is, recognised, accepted, labelled." I recalled these words, from the conversation of Katherine Mansfield in 1920,…

Review of 'With Great Pleasure' - the 1989 Readings by Gabriel Woolf

Well, Gabriel, you have completed the first twenty that 'will not come again'. It gives us great pleasure to say "thank you", on behalf of the George Eliot Fellowship, for all you have done for us. After twenty years we regard you as one of the…

Review of 'The Warwichshire Pen' - The 1988 George Eliot Readings by Gabriel Woolf

Being born in Warwickshire, it seems, confers distinction upon those who write. I can make this statement without giving myself airs, since I was born in another county, and, according to Gabriel Woolf, merely to dwell in Warwickshire is no guarantee…

George Eliot: The Jewish Connection by Ruth Levitt

George Eliot: The Jewish Connection, published in Israel in 1975, has recently come to our attention for review. Ruth Levitt, who lives in Israel, had read and admired Daniel Deronda, and was encouraged by George Eliot's sympathetic treatment of the…

Review of Parallel Lives: Five Victorian Marriages by Phyllis Rose

Charles Dickens wrote, in the Pickwick Papers, that a wedding is a licensed subject to joke upon, speaking merely of the ceremony. Phyllis Rose, in Parallel Lives, is concerned with what came after the wedding in the lives of five Victorian couples.…

Study Group Notes: Felix Holt and Daniel Deronda

The Study Group, which had begun with Middlemarch, ended with Felix Holt and Daniel Deronda. During the discussions it became clear that both eponymous "heroes" were less than satisfactory as presented to the reader, but it was not easy to say why…

Study Group Notes: The Mill on the Floss, Romola, and Silas Marner

When George Eliot stood on the bridge spanning the river which she called the Floss, her imagination must have been stirred by the power of the incoming tide as it met the strong current flowing purposefully towards the sea. This meeting of forces,…

Review: Particularities: Readings in George Eliot by Barbara Hardy

Barbara Hardy's pre-eminence as a George Eliot scholar is already well-established, and in this collection of ten essays and lectures, the first dating back to 1964, she continues her close analysis of the subtleties and nuances which mark George…

Review of The Clarendon Edition of Middlemarch edited by David Carroll

We welcome the Clarendon edition of George Eliot’s Middlemarch, which is generally considered to be her greatest novel. It took her about three years to write, and it seems to have caused a good deal of trouble to all concerned. David Carroll's…

Review of the Clarendon Edition of Scenes of Clerical Life edited by Thomas A. Noble

The editor's Introduction to an author's first work of fiction published in a new edition is of very special interest, since it is concerned with the foundations of a writer's art. The story of the transformation of Marian Lewes, née Mary Ann Evans,…

Review of Silas Marner - Not Quite a "Common Ol' Workin' Man" by Gabriel Woolf

To compile a programme of Readings about 'the curse of the drinking classes' (Oscar Wilde) which is both satisfying and moving, requires some diligence and industry. This belies Gabriel Woolf's statement, as he introduced himself to his audience,…

Study Group Notes: Scenes of Clerical Life and Adam Bede

The Study Group began by reading Middlemarch early in 1981, then, in the second half of the year, we went back to George Eliot’s first efforts in fiction and read Scenes of Clerical Life. We are reading for pleasure, chiefly, so at the end of…

The Middlemarch Collection

Recently I have been taking another look at the pictures in one of the nation’s celebrated galleries. The Middlemarch Collection was put together during the nineteenth century when the pictures were painted, and consists of portraits, subject or…

Review of George Eliot and the Visual Arts by Hugh Witemeyer

George Eliot and the Visual Arts is probably intended primarily for the student and specialist. However, the general reader who, in the words of Mr. Brooke in Middlemarch, does not mind ‘straining to keep up with’ the author, will find…

Mrs. Transome of Transome Court

In George Eliot’s novel, Felix Holt, the Radical, which is about social change in England, Mrs. Transome embodies the idea of traditional power. She is a member of the ruling class and a confirmed Tory. The lady and her home, Transome Court, stand…

Review of G. H. Lewes's Seaside Studies, "Brief Encounter"

I seemed to meet George Henry Lewes, ‘husband’ of George Eliot in the pages of his book, Seaside Studies. He emerged through the leaves, his bewhiskered face in shadow, on his head a broad-brimmed hat, his body bulky and shapeless in an old coat…