Browse Documents (208 total)

  • Tags: review

Review of The Persistent Self by H.S. Kakar

As a non-intellectual reader I am sometimes amused to observe the variety of red herrings sniffed at by the professional analysts of literature in their search for truth. H.S. Kakar of Delhi University, who has a sensitive nose, disperses some of the…

Review of Writing the Stage Coach Nation: Locality on the Move in Nineteenth-Century British Literature by Ruth Liversey

Starting from the observation that so many of the major Victorian novels are set, not in the railway age in which they were written, but in the horse-drawn world of the previous generation, a world that is 'just past', this fine study explores the…

Review of Victorian Narratives of the Recent Past: Memory, History, Fiction by Helen Kingstone

The nineteenth century saw a number of ways in which amateurs and professional historians and novelists approached the presentation of history, especially histories of the recent past. Eminent, professional historians at universities, and those…

Review of Victorians Undone by Kathryn Hughes

This is a superb book, written with deep scholarship by one of our leading biographers, which breaks new ground in its attention to the physicality of its subjects. In her introduction Kathryn Hughes says that she has felt 'chronically short-changed…

Review of The World of Mr. Casaubon: Britain's Wars of Mythography, 1700-1870 by Colin Kidd

The title ofthis book is interesting, as the subtitle describes what it is about but the main title refers to a fictional character from Middlemarch, part of a novel recently voted the greatest in English. Such a title makes the book much more…

Review of The Transferred Life of George Eliot by Philip Davis

There have been several good new biographies of George Eliot in recent years but none quite like this. Davis's subtle and searching analysis focuses almost exclusively on the writing as he traces the complex ways in which the experience of Mary Ann,…

Review of Selections From George Eliot's Letters by Gordon S. Haight

This is a most welcome and meticulous distillation of Dr. Haight's The George Eliot Letters in nine volumes, which in this age of the video cassette will be inaccessibIe even in many good reference libraries. My only reservation about the editing of…

Review of 'A Delicious Effervescence of the Mind': 1985 George Eliot Readings

"A delicious effervescence of the mind"? It is not a quality that one immediately associates with George Eliot, whose name and countenance promise more of the sturdier attributes and less of the "fizz". Yet in a brilliant recital by Gabriel Woolf and…

Review of Frederic Harrison: The Vocations of a Positivist by Martha S. Vogeler

This book, the result of more than half a lifetime's research, provides a much-needed insight into the nature of English Positivism and one of its leading disciples, Frederic Harrison. It opens excitingly with the twenty-three year old Harrison…

Review of Forms of Feeling in Victorian Fiction by Barbara Hardy

The art of representing feeling within a fictional character, and of eliciting response from the reader, was well understood by the great Victorian novelists. Their methods were so successful that the characters they created and the emotional…

Daniel Deronda: The Clarendon Edition of the Novels of George Eliot edited by Graham Handley

In writing Daniel Deronda George Eliot hoped 'to rouse the imagination of men and women to a vision of human claims in those races of their fellow-men who most differ from them in customs and beliefs'. Typically, her aspiration was suffused with…

Review of The Madwoman in the Attic by Sandra M. Gilbert and Susan Gubar

Virginia Woolf once wrote that spontaneous criticism, uttered as one tossed the finished book ‘into the next armchair with an exclamation of horror or delight’, is the most telling. On finishing The Madwoman in the Attic by Sandra M. Gilbert and…

Review of Eliza Lynn Linton by Herbert van Thal

Eliza Lynn Linton, who is probably known to George Eliot admirers less for her literary talents than for her harsh words against the lady, had a hard childhood. She was one of the 12 children who were out of the control of an over-burdened father.…

Review of Those of Us Who Loved Her by Kathleen Adams

This book, issued in the Centenary Year, makes no pretence to being academic, although in fact there is evidence of considerable research, particularly of a local nature. The men associated with Marian Evans throughout her career from provincial…

Review of George Eliot, Poetess by Wendy S. Williams

The word 'poetess' is contentious. For some it rankles, because the diminution of 'poet' is generally considered gratuitous, patronizing and offensive. More often than not, it belittles women writers and their work. Others, however, argue that it is…

Review of The Dog in the Dickensian Imagination by Beryl Gray

The nineteenth century saw great changes in the way the English thought about animals. This wasn't only because of Darwinian revelations; it was also the result of increased urbanization and industrialization. Less frequently confined to the farmyard…

Review of George Eliot and Money: Economics, Ethics and Literature by Dermot Coleman

This is an important book which fills a gap in George Eliot studies by exploring with impressive authority the novelist's handling of money and economics in her life and work, on the premise that, for her, the economic was an essential constituent of…

Review of Middlemarch: Critical Approaches to the Novel edited by Barbara Hardy

This book is a reprint of the 1967 edition published by the Athlone Press, one of '56 classic works of literary criticism' that Bloomsbury is reprinting from Athlone Press. This opportunity to revisit and reassess works that were highly regarded in…

Review of George Eliot's Feminism: 'The Right to Rebellion' by June Skye Szirotny

This luminous new work - dedicated to 'the millions of women deprived of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness by society's misogynist myths' - casts fresh light on George Eliot's feminism, which has often been the subject of controversy. 'I…

Review of Sophie and the Sybil: A Victorian Romance by Patricia Duncker

George Eliot's afterlife in adaptations of and sequels to her works is thin compared to those of such contemporaries as Dickens and the Brontës, and similarly the number of novels in which she appears as a character is meagre. True, as early as 1881…

Review of After Darwin: Animals, Emotions, and the Mind edited by Angelique Richardson

This extremely interesting and well organized collection of 11 original essays and an 'Afterword' is not greatly concerned with George Eliot, although it would seem every major Victorian concern somehow ends by involving her. As a study that aims at…

Review of Oscar Browning's Life of George Eliot

I would like to draw the attention of interested readers and George Eliot scholars to one of the earliest biographies of George Eliot, that written by Oscar Browning. It is a book which, apart from many interesting anecdotes of her life, might still…

Review of George Eliot in Context by Margaret Harris

This collection offers a wide range of individual and rigorous criticism, with essays by the most informed specialists: amongst others, Margaret Harris on 'Biographies', John Rignall on 'Landscape' and 'Metropolitanism', Melissa Raines on 'Language',…

Review of The Victorian Diary: Authorship and Emotional Labour by Anne-Marie Millim

The diary genre has been repeatedly explored both as a confessional, retrospective form of writing and 'as an inherently female genre' (p. 17). Refreshingly, Millim challenges these approaches by stressing not only the genre's multiplicity, but also…

Review of Heathen and Outcast: Scenes in the Life of George Eliot by Robert Muscutt

This fictionalized version of George Eliot's life between 1841 and 1854 takes as its starting point Edith Simcox's account of visiting the Midlands after the novelist's death and collecting material for a biography which, in the end, was never…