Browse Documents (208 total)

  • Tags: review

Review of Reading for Our Time: 'Adam Bede' and 'Middlemarch' Revisited by J. Hillis Miller

As his sub-title indicates, J. Hillis Miller is returning in his latest book to the study of George Eliot, bringing to bear on Adam Bede and Middlemarch the insight and erudition acquired in a long and distinguished career as a scholar and critic. He…

Review of The Ladislaw Case by Imke Thormahlen and translated by Marianne Thormählen

We live in an age of prequels and sequels either in book form or in television serials, with nineteenth-century novelists providing the majority of the material for contemporary writers to develop or elaborate. It was perhaps only a matter of time…

Review of George Eliot in Society: Travels Abroad and Sundays at the Priory by Kathleen McCormack

This is a welcome and wholly worthwhile extension of the author's George Eliot's English Travels: Composite Characters and Coded Communication (2005), a densely written and stimulating examination of places and people in Eliot's life which have some…

Review of Form and Feeling in Modern Literature: Essays in Honour of Barbara Hardy edited by William Baker and Isobel Armstrong

Does criticism move in circles and cycles? Perhaps, like a Yeatsian gyre, it progresses by revolving and rotating. If times have changed utterly since the appearance of Barbara Hardy's first book, The Novels of George Eliot (1959), then it is also…

Review of George Eliot: Interviews and Recollections edited by K. K. Collins

In his introduction to this fascinating collection of accounts and comments by those who met George Eliot, K. K. Collins points out that modem biographies draw on about forty recollections that have come to form a canon of reminiscence. To this canon…

Review of The Art of Comparison: How Novels and Critics Compare by Catherine Brown

This book is a defence of comparative literature in theory - if it has a theory - and in practice by concentrating on three novels - Daniel Deronda, Anna Karenina, Women in Love – which are structurally similar in various respects, most obviously…

Review of Modernizing George Eliot: The Novelist as Artist, Intellectual, Proto-Modernist, Cultural Critic by K.M. Newton

This distinguished work by a major Eliot scholar is the product of decades of reading, writing and reflection on her fiction and thought. It brings together in revised, homogenized form a series of essays from 1972 to the present day, including new…

Review of The Business of the Novel: Economics, Aesthetics and the Case of Middlemarch by Simon R. Frost

With excellent research available on the publication history of Middlemarch, including work by John Sutherland, N. N. Feltes, Carol Martin, David Finkelstein and others, it may seem surprising that an entire book has now been devoted to the topic.…

Review of Silas Marner on BBC Radio 4

Unheralded in the Radio Times and elsewhere, Silas Marner, dramatized by Richard Cameron, was broadcast as the Classic Serial on Radio 4 in two one-hour instalments on 16 and 23 October 2011. I was pleased that I spotted it. George Eliot has been…

Review of Landscape and Gender in the Novels of Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot and Thomas Hardy by Eithne Henson

At the heart of Eithne Henson's book is a comment made by George Eliot when she reviewed Ruskin's Lectures on Architecture and Painting in 1854: 'To a certain degree, all artistic interpretation of Nature is conventional' (p. 75). Henson's concern is…

Review of Women and Personal Property in the Victorian Novel by Deborah Wynne

Dorothea Brooke was reluctant to accept the bequest of her mother's jewellery, but was George Eliot equally resistant to the allure of pretty things? Deborah Wynne thinks not. Wynne cites a letter from Eliot to her friend Elma Stuart in which the…

Review of George Eliot, European Novelist by John Rignall

On the opening page of this series of connected essays, John Rignall points out that 'George Eliot's readers and reviewers took it for granted that her novels belonged to a European tradition of fiction'. When Leavis conscripted her into his new…

Review of Dorothea's Daughter and Other Nineteenth-Century Postscripts by Barbara Hardy

This book is the fruit of many years of thought about nine great novels. Barbara Hardy does not present us with a series of sequels, though we do learn of things that happened after the action of the novels ended. Rather, she offers a set of…

Review of The Life of George Eliot: A Critical Biography by Nancy Henry

The literary biographer's most difficult task is to find plausible, sophisticated ways of connecting a human life with the art that emerges from it. In the case of a major imaginative artist like George Eliot, the accumulated weight of previous…

Review of The Cambridge Companion to English Literature, 1830--1914 edited by Joanne Shattock

This anthology, edited by Joanne Shattock, with an introduction and contribution by her, contains a rich variety of essays by scholars from British, American and Canadian universities. It begins its survey of Victorian culture in the seven years…

Review of Imagining Italy: Victorian Writer and Travellers edited by Catherine Waters, Micael Hollington and John Jordan

Two of the essays in this volume take George Eliot's Romola as their subject. Both reward attention, and they may be in danger of escaping deserved notice given the major concentration here on the life and writing of Dickens. This is the second of…

Review of George Eliot's Grammar of Being by Melissa Anne Raines

Readers of The George Eliot Review will be familiar with the work of Melissa Anne Raines, which began with the publication of her prize-winning essay for the George Eliot Fellowship, and was followed by several articles, two in this journal, now part…

Review of Imagining Minds: The Neuro-Aesthetics of Austen, Eliot and Hardy by Kay Young

Imagining Minds sets out to read nineteenth-century fiction in the context of modern theories of human cognition and of the mind/body relationship, making the central contention that 'the novel is an aesthetic map to and experience of the nature of…

Review of Charles Dickens by Michael Slater

On the first page of this splendid new biography, Dickens is cited referring to his own earliest writings as 'certain tragedies achieved at the mature age of eight or ten and represented with great applause to overflowing nurseries'. The genially…

Review of George Eliot's Intellectual Life by Avrom Fleishman

Avrom Fleishman's study of George Eliot as a Victorian intellectual comes late in a distinguished career of scholarly publication that stretches over more than forty years. The book primarily concerns itself with some large questions: What were…

Review of Women Reviewing Women in Nineteenth-Century Britain: The Critical Reception of Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte and George Eliot by Joanne Wilkes

The subtitle of Joanne Wilkes' elegant and meticulous monograph is somewhat misleading. Although Austen, Bronte and Eliot make regular appearances, as one would expect the three major female literary figures of the nineteenth century to do, the work…

Review of Eliot's Middlemarch: Reader's Guide by Josie Billington

This new 'Reader's Guide' successfully complements two preceding works that were written for the same purpose of providing information and interpretation for readers of Middlemarch in a compact form: those by Karen Chase for Cambridge University…

Review of George Eliot: Novelist, Lover, Wife by Brenda Maddox

The distorted cover-image of George Eliot with a strange pen and a very small writing book. and the mind-reading at the beginning which tells us that one glance at the newborn Mary Ann, already possessed of a 'large drooping nose, long chin,…

Review of Victorian Turns, NeoVictorian Returns: Essays on Fiction and Culture edited by Penny Gay, Judith Johnston and Catherine Waters

The inside of this volume offers exactly the pleasurable variety and range of interest promised by its outside (the beautifully reproduced cover image is Ernest Dudley Heath's Piccadilly Circus at Night, 1893). As its title suggests, the volume,…