Browse Documents (208 total)

  • Tags: review

Daniel Deronda: The Clarendon Edition of the Novels of George Eliot edited by Graham Handley

In writing Daniel Deronda George Eliot hoped 'to rouse the imagination of men and women to a vision of human claims in those races of their fellow-men who most differ from them in customs and beliefs'. Typically, her aspiration was suffused with…

Review of Female Friendships and Communities: Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, and Elizabeth Gaskell by Pauline Nestor

Pauline Nestor's book traces the prominence, the emergence of women writers by the mid-nineteenth century, and the making of a community available to themselves. As she puts it, they were banding together, for 'women were no longer merely victims of…

Review of George Eliot by Jennifer Uglow

When I first heard that Virago were to publish a book about George Eliot (the author sought my help in locating certain photographs) I was a little apprehensive. I feared that this might be a militant feminist view of a lady who concerned herself…

Review of George Eliot: Romantic Humanist by K.M. Newton, Fictions of Resolution in Three Victorian Novels by David Deirdre and The Victorian Multiplot Novel by Peter K. Garrett

GEORGE ELIOT: ROMANTIC HUMANIST breaks much new ground and makes compelling if somewhat esoteric reading. He rightly notes George Eliot's scepticism with regard to the truth of philosophical systems and traces the relationship between Lewes's…

Review of Tea and Sprouts: The 1987 George Eliot Readings by Gabriel Woolf

Does the Englishman eat and drink only to stay alive? Using evidence provided by George Eliot, Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, Henry James, Jerome K. Jerome, Lewis Carroll and the poetic ponderings of mighty and minor poets, Gabriel Woolf took a…

Review of George Eliot and the Visual Arts by Hugh Witemeyer

George Eliot and the Visual Arts is probably intended primarily for the student and specialist. However, the general reader who, in the words of Mr. Brooke in Middlemarch, does not mind ‘straining to keep up with’ the author, will find…

Review of World's Classics Series: Felix Holt ed. by Fred C. Thomson

If one cannot afford the splendid Clarendon Editions of George Eiot's novels. the World's Classics editions are a very good second best. They are second -best, however, only in their format, since the text of the novels is the same. For the finer…

Review of Eliza Lynn Linton by Herbert van Thal

Eliza Lynn Linton, who is probably known to George Eliot admirers less for her literary talents than for her harsh words against the lady, had a hard childhood. She was one of the 12 children who were out of the control of an over-burdened father.…

Review of The Transformation of Rage: Mourning and Creativity in George Eliot's Fiction by Peggy Fitzhugh Johnstone

The thesis of this book is as follows. In her early life George Eliot experienced a number of bereavements: the deaths of her baby twin siblings in 1821, after which her mother withdrew emotionally from her life; her mother's own death in 1836, when…

Audio Cassette Review: Gabriel Woolf Reads a Second Selection from George Eliot

Gabriel WooIf' s second cassette of readings from George Eliot begins and ends with her poetry. However we assess the value of her poems, there can be no doubt that they raise issues that were fundamental to her. Nor can there be any doubt that the…

Review of 'A Delicious Effervescence of the Mind': 1985 George Eliot Readings

"A delicious effervescence of the mind"? It is not a quality that one immediately associates with George Eliot, whose name and countenance promise more of the sturdier attributes and less of the "fizz". Yet in a brilliant recital by Gabriel Woolf and…

Review of 'A Letter from George', a BBC CWR serialised reading

In choosing eight episodes of about ten minutes each it was inevitable that the life of the novelist would be fragmentary. By also deciding to let her tell her own story, some parts of her life were very well covered and others hardly mentioned at…

Review of 'The Lifted Veil,' adapted for the stage by Tim Heath, 2002

It was perhaps Herbert Spencer in his Autobiography (1904) who first disseminated the myth that, though George Eliot will remain for posterity one of our finest novelists, her weakness was that she could not construct effective, dramatic plots. By…

Review of 'The Story of Gwendolen Harleth' - Radio Adaptation Controversy

Another good bit of honest work was ‘The Story of Gwendolen Harleth’ abridged from ‘Daniel Deronda’, produced by Virginia Browne-Wilkinson originally for Woman’s Hour, and just concluded in the Book at Bedtime slot. I don’t usually listen…

Review of 'The Warwichshire Pen' - The 1988 George Eliot Readings by Gabriel Woolf

Being born in Warwickshire, it seems, confers distinction upon those who write. I can make this statement without giving myself airs, since I was born in another county, and, according to Gabriel Woolf, merely to dwell in Warwickshire is no guarantee…

Review of 'With Great Pleasure' - the 1989 Readings by Gabriel Woolf

Well, Gabriel, you have completed the first twenty that 'will not come again'. It gives us great pleasure to say "thank you", on behalf of the George Eliot Fellowship, for all you have done for us. After twenty years we regard you as one of the…

Review of "George Eliot: Silas Marner, The Lifted Veil, Brother Jacob" edited by Peter Mudford

Silas Marner, The Lifted Veil and Brother Jacob have formed a triple alliance ever since they were first published together at George Eliot's request in the Cabinet Edition of 1878. That the fellowship is far from uneasy is proved by Peter Mudford in…

Review of "Scenes from an Improper Life" by Stella Martin

Leamington’s Loft Theatre have taken a risk with their Golden Jubilee production. Rather than settling for an established showpiece, they have chosen to give us a world premiere – a play about the life of the novelist George Eliot. Risks are…

Review of 142 Strand: A Radical Address in Victorian London by Rosemary Ashton and George Eliot in Germany, 1854-55 by Gerlinde Röder-Bolton

The outlines of Marian Evans's life in the years immediately preceding her emergence as George Eliot are well-known-her work for the Westminster Review, her relationships with Chapman, Spencer and Lewes, and then her departure with the latter to…

Review of After Darwin: Animals, Emotions, and the Mind edited by Angelique Richardson

This extremely interesting and well organized collection of 11 original essays and an 'Afterword' is not greatly concerned with George Eliot, although it would seem every major Victorian concern somehow ends by involving her. As a study that aims at…

Review of Charles Dickens by Michael Slater

On the first page of this splendid new biography, Dickens is cited referring to his own earliest writings as 'certain tragedies achieved at the mature age of eight or ten and represented with great applause to overflowing nurseries'. The genially…

Review of Dorothea's Daughter and Other Nineteenth-Century Postscripts by Barbara Hardy

This book is the fruit of many years of thought about nine great novels. Barbara Hardy does not present us with a series of sequels, though we do learn of things that happened after the action of the novels ended. Rather, she offers a set of…

Review of Eliot's Middlemarch: Reader's Guide by Josie Billington

This new 'Reader's Guide' successfully complements two preceding works that were written for the same purpose of providing information and interpretation for readers of Middlemarch in a compact form: those by Karen Chase for Cambridge University…

Review of Form and Feeling in Modern Literature: Essays in Honour of Barbara Hardy edited by William Baker and Isobel Armstrong

Does criticism move in circles and cycles? Perhaps, like a Yeatsian gyre, it progresses by revolving and rotating. If times have changed utterly since the appearance of Barbara Hardy's first book, The Novels of George Eliot (1959), then it is also…