Browse Documents (13 total)

  • Tags: scenes of clerical life

Death and Recollection: The Elegiac Dimension of Scenes of Clerical Life

Perversely, though perhaps appropriately for a paper on death, I want to begin at the end. George Eliot's last novel, Daniel Deronda, ends with a good death: that of Ezra Mordecai, dying with the arms of Mirah and Deronda around him, and feeling 'an…

'Indications that I can touch the hearts of my fellow men': Reading Scenes of Clerical Life from a Kleinian Psychoanalytic Perspective

George Eliot tentatively reflected in her journal that she might be touching the hearts of her fellow men in Scenes of Clerical Life. In this short paper, I explore with the aid of Kleinian psychoanalytical ideas what might be involved in such a…

Orphic Variations in Scenes of Clerical Life

What shall I do without Euridice? / Where shall I go without my love? / Euridice! Euridice! / Oh god! Answer me! / Yet I am true to you! / Euridice! Euridice! / Ah, I can find no more / help nor hope, / in the world or in the…

'The stream of human thought and deed' in 'Mr Gilfil's Love-Story'

In George Eliot: The Emergent Self, Ruby Redinger explains that it was through the demands of authorship that the woman Marian Evans 'evolved into another self, her writing self', essentially becoming George Eliot. Literary biographies of George…

Scenes of Clerical Life: George Eliot's Version of Conversion

Before the publication of Scenes of Clerical Life, few people would have thought that Miss Evans had all the qualities for writing fiction, or, what is more, that she would become a great novelist. She was in her late thirties when she came to…

Conference Report, Annual George Eliot Conference, 2008: "on 'George Eliot's Beginnings: Scenes of Clerical Life Celebrated'"

Over three dozen people from around the United Kingdom and beyond gathered on Saturday 1 November 2008 to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the publication, in volume form, of George Eliot's Scenes of Clerical Life. Barbara Hardy warmly welcomed the…

Nobody's Daughters: Dickens's Tattycoram and George Eliot's Caterina Sarti

Doughty Street, where Dickens lived for three years (1836-9), is within a stone's throw of the site of London's Hospital for Foundling Children, which was established in 1739 by the retired sea-captain, Thomas Coram, whom Dickens venerated.…

Review of Scenes of Clerical Life ed. by Thomas A Noble

This edition of George Eliot's first fiction reproduces the text of the much acclaimed Clarendon Edition which is also edited by Thomas S. Noble. It is an excellent edition for a student because, besides being so reasonably priced, it contains a most…

Shakespearean Allusions in 'Janet's Repentance'

This paper is part of a comprehensive survey of Shakespeare's influence on George Eliot's writing, an influence widely recognised by critics but rarely given the detailed analysis it deserves. It seems to me that a study of this sort is needed…

Review of the Clarendon Edition of Scenes of Clerical Life edited by Thomas A. Noble

The editor's Introduction to an author's first work of fiction published in a new edition is of very special interest, since it is concerned with the foundations of a writer's art. The story of the transformation of Marian Lewes, née Mary Ann Evans,…

The Meaning of Milby in "Janet's Repentance"

Duty and its demands for self-sacrifice held a strong attraction for George Eliot throughout her long career. First as a critic, then as a novelist, she found great drama and moral instruction in the renouncing of personal inclination for a higher…

Study Group Notes: Scenes of Clerical Life and Adam Bede

The Study Group began by reading Middlemarch early in 1981, then, in the second half of the year, we went back to George Eliot’s first efforts in fiction and read Scenes of Clerical Life. We are reading for pleasure, chiefly, so at the end of…

Choir Invisible: A Music Gloss for "The Sad Fortunes of Rev. Amos Barton"

“Music – music – didn’t you hear it?” Milly Barton, the first of George Eliot’s heroines, imagines celestial music as she dies; George Eliot’s readers hear music throughout her prose and poetry. Many musical quotations and references…