Browse Documents (41 total)

  • Tags: Daniel Deronda

Conference Report, Annual George Eliot Conference University of London, 2015: "Daniel Deronda"

The conference opened with a characteristically rich and incisive paper by Barbara Hardy (Birkbeck), 'Re-Reading Daniel Deronda', which, sadly, was the last she was to deliver (see Obituary and Tributes elsewhere in this issue). She began by drawing…

Two Sequels to Daniel Deronda

The two sequels of my title are a seven page satirical squib in Mr Punch's Pocket-Book for 1877 entitled 'Daniel Deronda, Book IX', and a short novel or long story of around 50,000 words - much the same length as ' Mr Gilfil's Love-Story' -…

Daniel Deronda: George Eliot's "Negro Novel"

Daniel Deronda, G. H. Lewes once rather ingenuously explained, was "all about English ladies and gentlemen with the scene laid in Wiltshire" (Letters 6:136)2 ... and although the novel is evidently "about" far more than that, Lewes' words are a…

Daniel Deronda: The Clarendon Edition of the Novels of George Eliot edited by Graham Handley

In writing Daniel Deronda George Eliot hoped 'to rouse the imagination of men and women to a vision of human claims in those races of their fellow-men who most differ from them in customs and beliefs'. Typically, her aspiration was suffused with…

'Woman's freedom consists in choosing the husband who is to be her master': Existentialism and the Female Slave in Daniel Deronda

Various commentators have suggested that Daniel Deronda can be read as a text which espouses early existentialist principles, elevating the individual's search for personal truths above society's expectations and conceptions of duty. I am going to…

'In isolation human power is limited, in combination it is infinite': Tracing Ludwig Feuerbach's Essence of Christianity through Daniel Deronda

Written between January 1873 and June 1876, Daniel Deronda was George Eliot's final and most ambitious novel. The Jewish-born, later excommunicated Dutch philosopher Baruch Spinoza, whose Ethics Eliot translated in 1856, would perhaps seem the more…

Supplementary Annotations to Daniel Deronda

The annotations to the first and second Penguin Classics editions of Daniel Deronda, by Barbara Hardy and Terence Cave respectively, and those of the Oxford World's Classics edition, by Graham Handley, weave a web like that attributed by Marvell to…

Deronda and the Tigress: Buddhism, Compassion, and National Consciousness in Daniel Deronda (Prize Essay)

Many scholars have written about George Eliot's treatment of Judaism in Daniel Deronda (hereafter DD), but no one has yet explored why George Eliot includes Buddhism in the novel. Eliot engages with Buddhism most explicitly in chapter thirty-seven…

Review of Daniel Deronda, trans. Alain Jumeau

Alain Jumeau's new French translation of Daniel Deronda is the first since Ernest David's in 1881, 1882 and 1886, no longer easily accessible. Jumeau is an excellent George Eliot scholar as well as an experienced translator - his translations include…

Review of Daniel Deronda, adapted by John Cooper and performed by Traffic of the Stage

A dramatized version of Daniel Deronda scripted by John Cooper was produced by the Traffic of the Stage Company at the Upstairs at the Gatehouse Theatre in Highgate in May. Directed by Harry Meacher, it had a cast of seventeen actors who between them…

Mrs. Meyrick's Cat

'''Great God!" the words escaped Deronda' as he watched the just-prevented-from-drowning Mirah. 'The old thought had come now with a new impetus of mingled feeling, and urged that exclamation in which both East and West have for ages concentrated…

'Acting out' in Daniel Deronda

This short paper illustrates the way in which psychoanalytic perspectives can help us to understand the effect which a complex literary text like Daniel Deronda has on the reader. The two psychoanalytic perspectives used are Freud's insights into the…

Daniel Deronda: The Cultural Imperative of Religion

George Eliot's last novel Daniel Deronda differs strikingly from her earlier works in the presentation of its protagonists and her innovative use of the literary genres of realism and romanticism. In her earlier novels Eliot had espoused an idea of…

Imagination, Morality, and the Spectre of Sade in Romola and Daniel Deronda

In her final book, Impressions of Theophrastus Such, George Eliot vocalizes her contempt for writers who dismiss morality 'as a sort of twaddle for bibs and tuckers, a doctrine of dulness, a mere incident in human stupidity' (Impressions 134). It is…

Legitimate Plots, Private Lots in Felix Holt and Daniel Deronda

A preoccupation with the idea of home was central to George Eliot's fiction from its beginnings until its end. In Felix Holt and Daniel Deronda, however, this theme is developed in terms that involve legal complexities that have embroiled her…

Moving Beyond Signs: The Crisis of Language in Daniel Deronda

It is no critical initiative to point out that George Eliot's Daniel Deronda (1876) plays with the premises of realist narrative art.! Previous readings have, however, tended to engage only tangentially with the way in which the novel scrutinises the…

'That Vandyke Duchess': Portraiture and Epic in Daniel Deronda

Portraits abound in Daniel Deronda - not only on the drawing-room walls of the Grandcourts and Mallingers, and in the 'grave Holbein faces' of the Meyrick family lithographs, but also in the actions and physiognomies of the novel's characters…

Daniel Deronda (BBC 1) and George Eliot: A Scandalous Life (BBC 2)

The classic novel provides a tempting invitation for the contemporary film-maker: almost certainly it will have period costume, indoor amusements - preferably a dance, even better a ball - lavish, preferably country-house settings, consonant with…

Priest and Nun? Daniel Deronda, Anti-Catholicism and the Confessional

In Chapter 32 of Daniel Deronda, Sir Hugo Mallinger jocularly remarks to Deronda, 'You are always looking tenderly at the women, and talking to them in a Jesuitical way. You are a dan-gerous young fellow'.' Deronda responds with undue irritation,…

Daniel Deronda - 1921 Style

While we are still awaiting news of the completion of a new film of Daniel Deronda, some-thing that has been in the pipeline for some years, it is interesting to discover that in 1921, a cinema film of the novel was made by Butcher's Film Services…

A Note on Daniel Deronda's Circumcision

For the last twenty years or so critics have wondered if Daniel Deronda, the eponymous hero of George Eliot's last novel, was circumcised or not. If he was, he would scarcely have to wait for his mother's revelations to know he was a Jew. Some…

'Grand and Vague': Why is Daniel Deronda about the Jews? (Prize Winning Essay)

'I am sure you are right to leave everything grand and vague', George Eliot's publisher wrote bemusedly to her about Daniel Deronda's Zionism (Letters VI: 272). In his 'Conversation' on Daniel Deronda, Henry James too, like many contemporary and…

Gwendolyn's Story from Daniel Deronda (Audio Casette), read by Gabriel Woolf and Rosalind Shanks

In 1902, the essayist, Leslie Stephen, wrote that Daniel Deronda was 'two stories put side by side' and the 'Gwendolen Story' taken by itself was a 'masterly piece of social satire'. In his biography of George Eliot, Gordon Haight makes a general…

Music as a Sign in Daniel Deronda

The language of music communicates and contributes to spiritual transformation in Daniel Deronda. It expresses non-verbal truths about humanity's connection to the world, and unifies the novel with a continuous vocabulary since sound and silence are…

Women and Jews in Daniel Deronda

When Daniel Deronda was first published in 1876 George Eliot was disappointed that readers tended to 'cut the book into scraps and talk of nothing in it but Gwendolen. I meant everything in the book to be related to everything else there'. Her…