Browse Documents (18 total)

  • Tags: Romola

Orchestrating Society: The Merging of Language and Voice to Create Social Bonds in Romola

George Eliot's Romola (1863) reflects her interest in using musical metaphor to explain how relationships are formed. She explores more fully than she has done before this point in her career how language and the human voice function as music; she…

Romola and Politics

It could properly be argued that Romola is George Eliot's most overtly political novel. Unlike Felix Holt or Middlemarch it doesn't directly refer to near contemporary political events, or to those of George Eliot's childhood and youth. Unlike Adam…

Laughter versus Sympathy in Romola and Felix Holt

I want to start with a useful rather than a funny question posed by the critic Hilary M. Schor: 'What acts of information-organization do we perform on the Eliot career?'! The answer is possibly a succession of familiar base-touchings: Eliot's…

Romola's Religious Experience

Romola can be seen as a landmark in George Eliot's career, when we bear in mind her striking confession to her second husband, John Cross: 'I began it a young woman -, I finished it an old woman' (Haight [1968] 362). Many of her readers, indeed, felt…

George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 2012: "Romola's Artists"

2012-2013 marks the one hundred and fiftieth birthday of Romola. Originally published in the Cornhill Magazine from July 1862 to August 1863, it later appeared in a three volume edition in 1863. An illustrated edition followed in 1865. George Eliot…

George Eliot's Brazilian Critical Fortune and the Case of Romola

I would like to begin this paper with a comment by Professor Felicia Bonaparte about George Eliot's novels. In an introductory reflection, she once observed that We have found nothing yet that Eliot did not deliberately put in her novels; [ ... ].…

Notes on Middlemarch and Romola

Rereading Middlemarch and Romola recently, I was struck by some unrecorded musical and literary parallels, none of them substantial enough (or indeed sufficiently interconnected) to be woven into an integrated article, but having, I hope, enough…

Costanza, Constance, Custance, and Emaré: Romola's Medieval Ancestry (Prize Essay)

Arguably the most problematic episode of Romola for the novel's reviewers and critics is Romola's imitation of Boccaccio's heroine Costanza (or Gostanza) in the two chapters 'Drifting Away' and 'Romola's Waking'; even Romola's most favourable early…

Imagination, Morality, and the Spectre of Sade in Romola and Daniel Deronda

In her final book, Impressions of Theophrastus Such, George Eliot vocalizes her contempt for writers who dismiss morality 'as a sort of twaddle for bibs and tuckers, a doctrine of dulness, a mere incident in human stupidity' (Impressions 134). It is…

Review of From Author to Text: Re-reading George Eliot's 'Romola' ed. Caroline Levine and Mark W. Turner and George Eliot and Italy by Andrew Thompson

Each of these books took me by surprise. There is a curious tension between the incorpora-tiveness of Andrew Thompson's title, George Eliot and Italy, and his compendiously specific sub-title, Literary, Cultural and Political Influences from Dante to…

Conference Report, Centre for English Studies Conference, University of London, 1995: "Reviewing Romola"

George Eliot claimed that Romola was written with her 'best blood', and her contempo-raries certainly knew and appreciated the novel. Until late in the century Romola was even being regularly employed as a guidebook to Florence. But despite…

Tito, Dionysus and Apollo: an Examination of Tito Melema in Romola

Greek myth is significant throughout George Eliot’s work, and is especially important in the characterization of Tito Melema. A particular identification with Dionysus or Baccus begins early in the novel when Nello, after remarking that the newcomer…

Review of Romola (The Clarendon Edition) Edited by Andrew Brown

George Eliot wrote of Romola in 1877 that she 'could swear by every sentence as having been written with my best blood.' Romola was the only historical novel she ever wrote, and the editor of the Clarendon edition, Andrew Brown, describes it as 'the…

Romola on the American Stage

About George Eliot Americans were certain of two truths by the time of her death in 1880: she was a genius who was pushing the novel into a new terrain of seriousness, intense moral purpose, and artful design; she was also a glum realist in whose…

Study Group Notes: The Mill on the Floss, Romola, and Silas Marner

When George Eliot stood on the bridge spanning the river which she called the Floss, her imagination must have been stirred by the power of the incoming tide as it met the strong current flowing purposefully towards the sea. This meeting of forces,…

The Emergence of Women in Society as Revealed in George Eliot's Romola and Daniel Deronda

Anyone reading George Eliot's novels for the first time will be struck by the revelation that her heroines break with the traditional role these fair ladies have enacted in English-fiction prior to the appearance of The Mill on the Floss and its…

In Defense of Romola

Romola is not, and never has been, one of George Eliot’s more popular novels. Her contemporary critics were very hard on her ambitious Italian adventure, and, to this day, critical acclaim has not come to this novel which the author herself held in…